pronate


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pronate

 [pro´nāt]
to subject to pronation.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

pro·nate

(prō'nāt),
1. To perform pronation of the forearm or foot.
2. To assume, or to be placed in, a prone position.
[L. pronatus, fr. prono, pp. -atus, to bend forward, fr. pronus, bent forward]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

pronate

(prō′nāt′)
v. pro·nated, pro·nating, pro·nates
v.tr.
1.
a. To turn or rotate (the hand or forearm) so that the palm faces down or back.
b. To turn or rotate (the foot) by abduction and eversion so that the inner edge of the sole bears the body's weight.
2. To place in a prone position.
v.intr.
1. To become pronated.
2. To assume a prone position.

pro·na′tion n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

pronate

verb To turn facing downward, prone.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

pro·nate

(prō'nāt)
1. To assume, or to be placed in, a prone position.
2. To perform pronation of the forearm or foot.
[L. pronatus, fr. prono, pp. -atus, to bend forward, fr. pronus, bent forward]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
As it turned out, I severely over pronate, which in laymans terms means I put more pressure on the inner side of my foot.
The angle at which your sole lands has much to do with whether you excessively pronate or supinate.
THE EXPERT VIEW: Sports scientist and ex-Olympic cross-country runner Tony Bignell says, 'The vast majority of people tend to pronate to some extent while they run or walk.
With this keyboard they must substantially pronate the forearms substantially in order to hold their palms almost horizontally.
Not only do flip-flops provide little support, they may exaggerate any tendency to pronate. "My real concern is the slippage issue," says Stacy Barrows, PT, at Century City Physical Therapy in Los Angeles.
Wales and Great Britain 400m runner Iwan Thomas said, "I pronate because I have flat feet with no arch so I need a trainer to suit, with good heel support and a good arch, like the Asics Gel Kayano [which cost around pounds 100].
Subject 1 is unable to pronate or supinate; therefore, getting food into her mouth is a challenge, particularly finger foods.
In general, running shoes cause us to pronate more; stability minimizes this effect.
A runner with high arches will tend to under pronate during midstance.
Imagine the heel to be a pendulum swinging in and out as you supinate and pronate.
"Then dancers tend to pronate the foot, which can lead to flexor hallucis longus (FHL) trouble, the Achilles of dancer's foot," she adds.
The majority of amateur runners pronate for too long during the running gait.