prolapse

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prolapse

 [pro´laps]
1. the falling down or downward displacement of a part or viscus; called also procidentia and ptosis.
2. to undergo such displacement.
prolapse of cord protrusion of the umbilical cord ahead of the presenting part of the fetus in labor.
Variations of prolapsed umbilical cord. From McKinney et al., 2000.
prolapse of the iris protrusion of the iris through a wound in the cornea.
mitral valve prolapse see mitral valve prolapse.
rectal prolapse (prolapse of rectum) protrusion of the rectal mucous membrane through the anus.
prolapse of uterus downward displacement of the uterus so that the cervix is within the vaginal orifice (first-degree prolapse), the cervix is outside the orifice (second-degree prolapse), or the entire uterus is outside the orifice (third-degree prolapse).

pro·lapse

(prō-laps'),
1. To sink down, said of an organ or other part.
See also: procidentia, ptosis.
2. A sinking of an organ or other part, especially its appearance at a natural or artificial orifice.
See also: procidentia, ptosis.
[L. prolapsus, a falling]

prolapse

(prō-lăps′) Medicine
intr.v. pro·lapsed, pro·lapsing, pro·lapses
To fall or slip out of place.
n. prolapse (prō′lăps′, prō-lăps′) also prolapsus (prō-lăp′səs)
The falling down or slipping out of place of an organ or part, such as the uterus.

prolapse

The sinking or lowering of an organ or tissue. See Genital prolapse, Mitral valve prolapse, Rectal prolapse, Uterine prolapse.

pro·lapse

(prō'laps)
1. To sink down; said of an organ or other part.
2. A sinking of an organ or other part, especially its appearance at a natural or artificial orifice.
See also: procidentia, ptosis
[L. prolapsus, a falling]

prolapse

The downward displacement, or movement to an abnormal position, of a body part or tissue. Common examples are prolapse of the uterus (PROCIDENTIA), prolapse of the RECTUM and prolapse of the pulpy centre of an intervertebral disc.

pro·lapse

(prō'laps)
1. To sink down; said of an organ or other part.
2. A sinking of an organ or other part, especially its appearance at a natural or artificial orifice.
[L. prolapsus, a falling]
References in periodicals archive ?
IVU may demonstrate pelvi-calyceal anatomy and the ureterocele as a cystic intravesical-filling defect.[sup.8] MRI may demonstrate the extension of the ureterocele through the urethra and its association with a duplex system.[sup.6] As either of the moieties can be functioning poorly in a duplex system, a MAG-3 isotopic renogram becomes useful for considering the different options in management.[sup.10] The differential diagnosis of a prolapsing cecoureterocele in newborns includes epidermal inclusion cyst, Skene's duct cyst, urethral prolapse, and sarcoma botrioides.[sup.1,3,7,8]
A newborn with a prolapsing cecoureterocele provides an interesting challenge to the pediatric urologist.
A In pelvic organ prolapse, the various parts of the support structure that holds pelvic organs, tissues, and structures in place weaken, resulting in the bladder, uterus or rectum dropping, or prolapsing. This support network includes the skin and muscles of the vaginal walls, the ligaments that hold the uterus in place, and the pelvic floor muscles, which span the area under the pelvis.
An enlarged prolapsing Mitral valve may cause abnormal stress on the papillary muscles and stretch induced arrhythmias by mechanoelectrical feedback mechanism.1