prolapse

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prolapse

 [pro´laps]
1. the falling down or downward displacement of a part or viscus; called also procidentia and ptosis.
2. to undergo such displacement.
prolapse of cord protrusion of the umbilical cord ahead of the presenting part of the fetus in labor.
Variations of prolapsed umbilical cord. From McKinney et al., 2000.
prolapse of the iris protrusion of the iris through a wound in the cornea.
mitral valve prolapse see mitral valve prolapse.
rectal prolapse (prolapse of rectum) protrusion of the rectal mucous membrane through the anus.
prolapse of uterus downward displacement of the uterus so that the cervix is within the vaginal orifice (first-degree prolapse), the cervix is outside the orifice (second-degree prolapse), or the entire uterus is outside the orifice (third-degree prolapse).

pro·lapse

(prō-laps'),
1. To sink down, said of an organ or other part.
See also: procidentia, ptosis.
2. A sinking of an organ or other part, especially its appearance at a natural or artificial orifice.
See also: procidentia, ptosis.
[L. prolapsus, a falling]

prolapse

(prō-lăps′) Medicine
intr.v. pro·lapsed, pro·lapsing, pro·lapses
To fall or slip out of place.
n. prolapse (prō′lăps′, prō-lăps′) also prolapsus (prō-lăp′səs)
The falling down or slipping out of place of an organ or part, such as the uterus.

prolapse

The sinking or lowering of an organ or tissue. See Genital prolapse, Mitral valve prolapse, Rectal prolapse, Uterine prolapse.

pro·lapse

(prō'laps)
1. To sink down; said of an organ or other part.
2. A sinking of an organ or other part, especially its appearance at a natural or artificial orifice.
See also: procidentia, ptosis
[L. prolapsus, a falling]

prolapse

The downward displacement, or movement to an abnormal position, of a body part or tissue. Common examples are prolapse of the uterus (PROCIDENTIA), prolapse of the RECTUM and prolapse of the pulpy centre of an intervertebral disc.

pro·lapse

(prō'laps)
1. To sink down; said of an organ or other part.
2. A sinking of an organ or other part, especially its appearance at a natural or artificial orifice.
[L. prolapsus, a falling]
References in periodicals archive ?
The objective of this study was to compare patient's response rate with and without mechanical bowel preparation before vaginal prolapse surgery.
Key words: prolapse, colonic intussusception, oviductal prolapse, cloacolith, enterotomy, anastomosis, raptor, cloaca, avian
With over 200 000 surgeries performed yearly, pelvic organ prolapse (POP), often associated with stress urinary incontinence, is a major health concern, especially for parous and elderly women.[sup.1] Numerous abdominal and vaginal surgical techniques are available to treat POP.
Management of anterior wall prolapse is consequently a significant challenge--one that has led surgeons to use various graft materials to reduce the rate of failure of transvaginal repair and subsequent prolapse recurrence.
* Relate pelvic organ prolapse to urinary and fecal incontinence.
For the study of pelvic prolapses, the anatomic landmark was considered the pubococcygeal line that extends from the inferior margin of the pubis bone to the sacrococcygeal joint.
Twenty-eight women had marked uterovaginal prolapse, and four had vault prolapse following hysterectomy.
Post partum utero-vaginal prolapse is an emergency, which needs immediate attention, otherwise mutilation may lead to severe lacerations and profuse bleeding or else interference to blood supply to prolapsed tissue may result in oedema and cyanosis which may eventually result in gangrene of uterus (Arthur et al., 1996; Joseph et al., 2001).
These displacements are typically graded on a scale of 0 to 4, with 0 being no prolapse and 4 being total prolapse (called procidentia).
Vaginal vault prolapse is accompanied by marked prolapse of the bladder and rectum.