prolapse

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prolapse

 [pro´laps]
1. the falling down or downward displacement of a part or viscus; called also procidentia and ptosis.
2. to undergo such displacement.
prolapse of cord protrusion of the umbilical cord ahead of the presenting part of the fetus in labor.
Variations of prolapsed umbilical cord. From McKinney et al., 2000.
prolapse of the iris protrusion of the iris through a wound in the cornea.
mitral valve prolapse see mitral valve prolapse.
rectal prolapse (prolapse of rectum) protrusion of the rectal mucous membrane through the anus.
prolapse of uterus downward displacement of the uterus so that the cervix is within the vaginal orifice (first-degree prolapse), the cervix is outside the orifice (second-degree prolapse), or the entire uterus is outside the orifice (third-degree prolapse).

pro·lapse

(prō-laps'),
1. To sink down, said of an organ or other part.
See also: procidentia, ptosis.
2. A sinking of an organ or other part, especially its appearance at a natural or artificial orifice.
See also: procidentia, ptosis.
[L. prolapsus, a falling]

prolapse

(prō-lăps′) Medicine
intr.v. pro·lapsed, pro·lapsing, pro·lapses
To fall or slip out of place.
n. prolapse (prō′lăps′, prō-lăps′) also prolapsus (prō-lăp′səs)
The falling down or slipping out of place of an organ or part, such as the uterus.

prolapse

The sinking or lowering of an organ or tissue. See Genital prolapse, Mitral valve prolapse, Rectal prolapse, Uterine prolapse.

pro·lapse

(prō'laps)
1. To sink down; said of an organ or other part.
2. A sinking of an organ or other part, especially its appearance at a natural or artificial orifice.
See also: procidentia, ptosis
[L. prolapsus, a falling]

prolapse

The downward displacement, or movement to an abnormal position, of a body part or tissue. Common examples are prolapse of the uterus (PROCIDENTIA), prolapse of the RECTUM and prolapse of the pulpy centre of an intervertebral disc.

pro·lapse

(prō'laps)
1. To sink down; said of an organ or other part.
2. A sinking of an organ or other part, especially its appearance at a natural or artificial orifice.
[L. prolapsus, a falling]
References in periodicals archive ?
Pelvic floor four-dimensional ultrasound indicated that bladder neck mobility was slightly increasing, posterior wall of the bladder was slightly bulged, and anterior vaginal wall was slightly prolapsed in anterior compartment.
In present case, prolapsed preputial tissue was removed surgically through circumcision.
The prolapsed tissue was edematous and ulcerated on some areas.
In these birds, the prolapsed oviduct had varying degrees of tissue trauma, and in all cases, the birds appeared to be in hypovolemic shock.
Keratinization and pigmentation of vaginal mucosa and ulceration of the prolapsed tissue are caused by friction, congestion, and circulatory changes in the dependent part of the prolapse-decubitus ulcer.
Several surgical techniques have been described, the most popular being excision of the prolapsed mucosa and reapproximation of the mucosal margins with absorbable suture.
1b: Genital picture of the same newborn patient during micturition showing the increasing size of the prolapsed cystic mass.
(See figure 3B.) Allis clamps are placed on the lateral aspects of the pubocervical fascia and are lifted superiorly to expose the prolapsed bladder.
The doctor will carefully examine your vulva and vagina for any lesions or ulcers and will perform an internal examination to identify any prolapsed organs.
Women with no or very mild symptoms don't need treatment for pelvic organ prolapse, but if you're experiencing major discomfort, surgery to reposition and secure the prolapsed organ is the only definitive way to relieve symptoms.
On inspection of the vagina there was a huge uterovaginal prolapse with decubitus ulcer on the cervix measuring 7 x 1 centimetres and a prolapsed foot (Figure 1).
The prolapsed organ is reduced and the patient is observed for urinary leakage on exertion.