prolapse


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prolapse

 [pro´laps]
1. the falling down or downward displacement of a part or viscus; called also procidentia and ptosis.
2. to undergo such displacement.
prolapse of cord protrusion of the umbilical cord ahead of the presenting part of the fetus in labor.
Variations of prolapsed umbilical cord. From McKinney et al., 2000.
prolapse of the iris protrusion of the iris through a wound in the cornea.
mitral valve prolapse see mitral valve prolapse.
rectal prolapse (prolapse of rectum) protrusion of the rectal mucous membrane through the anus.
prolapse of uterus downward displacement of the uterus so that the cervix is within the vaginal orifice (first-degree prolapse), the cervix is outside the orifice (second-degree prolapse), or the entire uterus is outside the orifice (third-degree prolapse).

pro·lapse

(prō-laps'),
1. To sink down, said of an organ or other part.
See also: procidentia, ptosis.
2. A sinking of an organ or other part, especially its appearance at a natural or artificial orifice.
See also: procidentia, ptosis.
[L. prolapsus, a falling]

prolapse

(prō-lăps′) Medicine
intr.v. pro·lapsed, pro·lapsing, pro·lapses
To fall or slip out of place.
n. prolapse (prō′lăps′, prō-lăps′) also prolapsus (prō-lăp′səs)
The falling down or slipping out of place of an organ or part, such as the uterus.

prolapse

The sinking or lowering of an organ or tissue. See Genital prolapse, Mitral valve prolapse, Rectal prolapse, Uterine prolapse.

pro·lapse

(prō'laps)
1. To sink down; said of an organ or other part.
2. A sinking of an organ or other part, especially its appearance at a natural or artificial orifice.
See also: procidentia, ptosis
[L. prolapsus, a falling]

prolapse

The downward displacement, or movement to an abnormal position, of a body part or tissue. Common examples are prolapse of the uterus (PROCIDENTIA), prolapse of the RECTUM and prolapse of the pulpy centre of an intervertebral disc.

pro·lapse

(prō'laps)
1. To sink down; said of an organ or other part.
2. A sinking of an organ or other part, especially its appearance at a natural or artificial orifice.
[L. prolapsus, a falling]
References in periodicals archive ?
The objective of this study was to compare patient's response rate with and without mechanical bowel preparation before vaginal prolapse surgery.
Surgical therapy is the mainstay of treatment for POP, and 20% of US women will undergo prolapse and/or stress incontinence surgery by age 80.1 Prolapse surgery either restores the vaginal anatomy (reconstructive surgery) or obliterates the vaginal canal (obliterative surgery).
There was neither history of pelvic trauma or prolapse, nor any stress incontinence during or after the first pregnancy.
A brief description of the terminology used for pelvic organ prolapse and SUI is given below.
Preputial prolapse adversely affects penis function because protrusion of penis depends on free movement of preputial mucosa and any fibrotic lesion in this tissue seriously impedes the ability of penis to extend (Arthur et al., 1996).
The statement regarding the use of transvaginal mesh for prolapse states that there may be a higher rate of complications compared to traditional operations, which do not use synthetic mesh.
About 30 to 40 percent of women develop some degree of pelvic organ prolapse in their lifetime--increasing age is one of the risk factors, along with childbirth, hysterectomy and obesity.
The SGS suggested uterine preservation during laparoscopic native tissue prolapse repair to reduce operating room time and blood loss, and preserve vaginal length, based on four nonrandomized comparison studies using various approaches, with a total of 446 women and up to 3 years' follow-up.
On examination, the unilaterally uterine prolapse and first degree perineal laceration were diagnosed.
It is a safe procedure and should be considered as an option for the treatment of pelvic organ prolapse in young women, in whom uterine conservation is required.