projective test


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projective test

 
any of various tests in which an individual interprets ambiguous stimulus situations, e.g., a series of inkblots (Rorschach t.), according to his own unconscious dispositions, thus yielding information about his personality structure, its underlying dynamics, and possible psychopathology.

pro·jec·tive test

a loosely structured psychological test containing many ambiguous stimuli that require the subject to reveal feelings, personality, or psychopathology in response to them; for example, Rorschach test, thematic apperception test.

projective test

n.
A psychological test in which a subject's responses to ambiguous or unstructured standard stimuli, such as a series of cartoons, abstract patterns, or incomplete sentences, are analyzed in order to determine underlying personality traits, feelings, or attitudes.

projective test

[-jek′tiv]
Etymology: L, projectio, thrown forward
a kind of diagnostic, psychological, or personality test that uses unstructured or ambiguous stimuli, such as inkblots, a series of pictures, abstract patterns, or incomplete sentences, to elicit responses that reflect a projection of various aspects of the individual's personality. See also Rorschach test.

projective test

Projection test Psychology A psychologic tests in which a person is presented with unstructured external stimuli–eg, Rorschach inkblots, thematic apperception test, that are ambiguous and subject to subjective interpretation; analysis of responses to the situations or images in a PT provides–in theory, information on unconscious desires, personality traits, interpersonal dynamics. See Psychological testing, Rorschach test.

pro·jec·tive test

(prŏ-jektiv test)
Loosely structured psychological assessment containing ambiguous stimuli that require the patient to reveal feelings, personality, or psychopathology in response.

Projective test

A type of psychological test that assesses a person's thinking patterns, observational ability, feelings, and attitudes on the basis of responses to ambiguous test materials. It is not intended to diagnose psychiatric disorders.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Projective Test of Work Ethic consists of six pictures of people in a variety of ambiguous situations.
Thus, based on the current professional sentiment toward projective techniques, I offer the following predictions: a) academic/internship coverage of projective assessment will become non-existent in clinical psychology training in the USA and selectively emphasized in school psychology programs; b) projective tests will continue to be part of the assessment armamentarium in a small minority of mental health settings in the USA, and c) attitudes toward and use of projective assessment will remain in high regard overseas, at select universities and in professional practice across many nations around the world--this is based on reviews of survey studies (Piotrowski, 2015) and unpublished reports from countries like Japan and Peru.
We identified a gap in the research regarding the influence of personality characteristics on performance in instruments beyond projective tests.
Although the use of projective tests by counselors is prohibited in some states and generally requires additional training if counselors are to administer them ethically (Licensed Professional Counselor Act, 1999; Naugle, 2009), these instruments were found to be used more frequently than intelligence/ cognitive and environmental/interpersonal tests.
However, differences appear in rankings of the more clinical assessment instruments, such as the projective tests and the objective personality tests.
25) We believe that there is a need in South Africa for more and valid tests of psychological constructs other than intelligence, such as personality inventories, projective tests and self-report measures of emotional variables such as anxiety, anger, etc.
Compared with projective tests, objective tests are more independent of contemporary psychological theory; are relatively brief; are frequently self-administered, require less professional training to administer, score, and interpret; have reproducible and generally acceptable norms for psychiatric and forensic populations; and are more acceptable to the court system.
Also, instructions are provided for authors who wish to retain copyright to a new test or questionnaire, while caution is still advised for use of commercial intelligence or projective tests.
On their projective tests, as in their relations with their children, some continued to be "fixed more on a sibling level than on a maternal level.
Although the use of projective tests remains controversial, and evaluations drawn from them must be regarded cautiously, it seems unlikely that more extensive psychological testing would have detected unbalanced mental states in all of the percipients.