projective technique


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

projective technique

Any of several forms of psychological assessment or evaluation. The subject's comments about the results or products of ambiguous activities and tasks that encourage self-expression are evaluated and interpreted to determine indications of his unconscious needs, thoughts, or concerns.
See also: technique
References in periodicals archive ?
376), and projective techniques such as sand tray therapy are "more adaptable to diverse client populations than pencil and paper inventories, and they can access the kinesthetic energy and movement within a client's world missed by verbal interviews" (p.
In doing so it has also responded to Rook's (1985) call for increased research attention to consumption symbolism through projective techniques. Our study intercepted consumers during a particular shopping activity and then engaged them in a TAT.(3) From this approach we were able to gather some penetrating insights about a particular retail experience (self-gifts) that was relevant to a broad target group (women, 20-50 years of age).
Moreover, the expressions and illustrations generated from the projective techniques were also thematically analyzed with the aid of qualitative content analysis accompanied by the two-staged thematic approach (Soane et al., 2012).
Second, we use projective techniques as an input to psychological analysis of what is driving the brand equity.
This expression of emotion is an integral component of counseling and includes interventions with writing, drawing, poetry, projective techniques, and dream work.
The experiential therapies, especially Gestalt, utilize projective techniques other than the specialized projection of transference.
Projective techniques have been a common tool used in consumer research over recent years.
When we make use of other and more indirect measures of brand associations, such as visual and projective techniques (to be described below), we increase the probability of detecting hidden associations, but at the same time increase the risk of evoking irrelevant associations.
The premise of this book is not new, since Freud identified projective techniques as "a process of ascribing one's own drives, feelings and sentiments to other people or to the outside world" in 1896.
The brand promise must be executed, leveraging the brand and leveraging that particular advantage using projective techniques to perfect the rapport with all audiences.
Projective techniques can play an important role in motivational research.
In qualitative research much depends on the respondent "co-operating fully" with what may seem to be an unusual and demanding type of interview - especially relatively unstructured interviews and those which include requests to participate in potentially embarrassing exercises (projective techniques).