projection

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projection

 [pro-jek´shun]
1. a throwing forward, especially the reference of impressions made on the sense organs to their proper source, so as to locate correctly the objects producing them.
2. a connection between the cerebral cortex and other parts of the nervous system or organs of special sense.
3. the condition of extending or jutting out, or a part that juts out.
4. in psychiatry, an unconscious defense mechanism whereby emotionally unacceptable traits are denied in oneself and are regarded (projected) as belonging to the external world or to someone else. It is often called the “blaming” mechanism because in using it the person seeks to place the blame for personal inadequacies upon someone else. In its extreme form projection can lead to hostility and physical attack upon others when one mistakenly perceives other persons as responsible for one's own mental anguish.
5. the orientation of a radiographic machine in relation to the body or a body part; called also view.

pro·jec·tion

(prō-jek'shŭn),
1. A pushing out; an outgrowth or protuberance.
2. The referring of a sensation to the object producing it.
3. A defense mechanism by which a repressed complex in the person is denied and conceived as belonging to someone else, as when faults that the person tends to commit are perceived in or attributed to others.
4. The conception by the consciousness of a mental occurrence belonging to the self as of external origin.
5. Localization of visual impressions in space.
6. neuroanatomy the system or systems of nerve fibers (projection fibers [TA]) by which a group of nerve cells discharges its nerve impulses ("projects") to one or more other cell groups.
7. The image of a three-dimensional object on a plane, as in a radiograph.
8. radiography standardized views of parts of the body, described by body part position, the direction of the x-ray beam through the body part, or by eponym.
Synonym(s): norma (3) , salient (1) , view
[L. projectio; fr. pro- jicio, pp. -jectus, to throw before]

projection

(prə-jĕk′shən)
n.
1. A thing or part that extends outward beyond a prevailing line or surface.
2. The attribution of one's own attitudes, feelings, or desires to someone or something else as an unconscious defense against anxiety or guilt.
3. Any of the systems of nerve fibers by which a group of nerve cells discharges its nerve impulses to one or more other cell groups.

projection

Psychiatry A defense mechanism, operating unconsciously, in that which is emotionally unacceptable in the self is unconsciously rejected and attributed–projected–to others

pro·jec·tion

(prŏ-jek'shŭn)
1. A pushing out; an outgrowth or protuberance.
2. The referring of a sensation to the object producing it.
3. psychology/psychiatry A defense mechanism by which a repressed complex in the patient is denied and conceived as belonging to another person, as when faults that the person tends to commit are perceived in or attributed to others.
4. The conception by the consciousness of a mental occurrence belonging to the self as of external origin.
5. Localization of visual impressions in space.
6. neuroanatomy The system or systems of nerve fibers by which a group of nerve cells discharges its nerve impulses ("projects") to one or more other cell groups.
7. The image of a three-dimensional object on a plane, as in a radiograph.
8. radiography A standard x-ray study, named by body part, position, direction of the x-ray beam through the body part, or eponym.
[L. projectio; fr. pro- jicio, pp. -jectus, to throw before]

projection 

1. Localization of visual impressions from the eye to the apparent source of the stimulus, such as up and to the left. This is sometimes referred to as mental projection.
2. A prominence.
3. The imaging of an object onto a screen or a surface.
erroneous projection See false projection.
false projection The false positioning in space of a visual sensation arising from a retinal image formed in an eye with paresis of an extraocular muscle. The visual sensation appears in the direction of normal action of the paretic muscle. Example: past-pointing. Syn. erroneous projection; malprojection. See past pointing.

pro·jec·tion

(prŏ-jek'shŭn)
1. [TA] A pushing out; an outgrowth or protuberance.
2. The referring of a sensation to the object producing it.
3. System or systems of nerve fibers (projection fibers [TA]) by which a group of nerve cells discharges its nerve impulses ("projects") to one or more other cell groups.
4. In radiography, standardized views of parts of body, described by body part position or direction of the x-ray beam through body part.
[L. projectio; fr. pro- jicio, pp. -jectus, to throw before]

Patient discussion about projection

Q. Anyone whos doctor here and is willing to help me fillin in questionare for my project? hello, my name is edward sinanta from indonesia, i am a high school student and i would like to request an interview with you for a essay regarding the trend of health problem consultation in social networking. if you don't mind to be interviewed about this issue, please notify me through this e-mail and we can discuss the details later on. thank you for your time and attention. regards, edward

A. edward, i'm not a doctor so i can't help you ,but i hope you'll find what you are looking for and way to go on finding resources for your project!!

Q. I am getting confused with my project.. I am depressed.What can i do? Soon I will be completing my French classes. As my classes are coming close I have started developing negative mind set. I don’t understand that how my classmates are doing well. I hope they do not have any stress but I am having severe stress. I am getting scared and looks like that I may fail in my classes.. I am not able to concentrate on my classes. I am getting confused with my project. My sleep has become very difficult. I too worry about the job. I am depressed. There is no support from my classmates. Please help me what shall I do?

A. You need to find a stress reliever in your life. Think of everything from going to the gym to simple interactions with others. After you have achieved a plateau of stress relief. Sit down in a non stressful place and study. Good Luck

More discussions about projection
References in periodicals archive ?
The projectionist must receive the films, check them, repair when necessary and store them, and load the spools onto the machinery in the right order.
Records kept by Devries and part-time projectionist Sam Mcintyre of would-be customers turned away showed an over 25 per cent success rate for the pickets in the first month.
REEL GOOD: John Brockington, is the face of The Last Projectionist It's a well-made, fascinating documentary which will delight social historians, thrill cinephiles and enlighten younger generations who probably take the general quality of filmmaking today for granted.
where he stayed for 35 years, working his way tip to chief projectionist. During his off hours, he became one of a few technicians running film on the Bel-Air circuit, where he showed films to everyone from Ronald Reagan to Audrey Hepbern to Barry White.
Trainee projectionists work a basic 40-hour week with salaries linked to age and experience.
Aarons said the project was designed to comply with all Americans With Disabilities Act provisions, and one of the elevators is strictly to provide handicapped access to the mezzanine level projection booths in case one of the projectionists is handicapped.
He is one of the last few original projectionists still around and more wonderful memories of a bygone era about the lost cinemas of Liverpool are on line at Picturepalace.org Mark Lees (ex-cinema projectionist), Wallasey
THE dawn of digital technology has marked the end of an era for two Tyneside cinema projectionists. Stephen Lowthian and Neil Thompson, 56, from Swalwell, Gateshead, have worked in some of Newcastle's bestknown cinemas but were made redundant from their jobs at the city's Empire cinema last week.
Many cinema chains are currently phasing out traditional projectionists in the biggest shake-up "since colour.
My fellow projectionists were Jack Yates and Peter Tudge and I often wonder where they are now.
"I was asked to work there to help Bill Perry, so that he and the other projectionists could have a night off."