projection


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projection

 [pro-jek´shun]
1. a throwing forward, especially the reference of impressions made on the sense organs to their proper source, so as to locate correctly the objects producing them.
2. a connection between the cerebral cortex and other parts of the nervous system or organs of special sense.
3. the condition of extending or jutting out, or a part that juts out.
4. in psychiatry, an unconscious defense mechanism whereby emotionally unacceptable traits are denied in oneself and are regarded (projected) as belonging to the external world or to someone else. It is often called the “blaming” mechanism because in using it the person seeks to place the blame for personal inadequacies upon someone else. In its extreme form projection can lead to hostility and physical attack upon others when one mistakenly perceives other persons as responsible for one's own mental anguish.
5. the orientation of a radiographic machine in relation to the body or a body part; called also view.

pro·jec·tion

(prō-jek'shŭn),
1. A pushing out; an outgrowth or protuberance.
2. The referring of a sensation to the object producing it.
3. A defense mechanism by which a repressed complex in the person is denied and conceived as belonging to someone else, as when faults that the person tends to commit are perceived in or attributed to others.
4. The conception by the consciousness of a mental occurrence belonging to the self as of external origin.
5. Localization of visual impressions in space.
6. neuroanatomy the system or systems of nerve fibers (projection fibers [TA]) by which a group of nerve cells discharges its nerve impulses ("projects") to one or more other cell groups.
7. The image of a three-dimensional object on a plane, as in a radiograph.
8. radiography standardized views of parts of the body, described by body part position, the direction of the x-ray beam through the body part, or by eponym.
Synonym(s): norma (3) , salient (1) , view
[L. projectio; fr. pro- jicio, pp. -jectus, to throw before]

projection

/pro·jec·tion/ (-jek´shun)
1. a throwing forward, especially the reference of impressions made on the sense organs to their proper source, so as to locate correctly the objects producing them.
2. a connection between the cerebral cortex and other parts of the nervous system or organs of special sense.
3. the act of extending or jutting out, or a part that juts out.
4. an unconscious defense mechanism by which a person attributes to someone else unacknowledged ideas, thoughts, feelings, and impulses that they cannot accept as their own.
5. the orientation of a radiographic machine in relation to the body or a body part.

projection

(prə-jĕk′shən)
n.
1. A thing or part that extends outward beyond a prevailing line or surface.
2. The attribution of one's own attitudes, feelings, or desires to someone or something else as an unconscious defense against anxiety or guilt.
3. Any of the systems of nerve fibers by which a group of nerve cells discharges its nerve impulses to one or more other cell groups.

projection

[-jek′shən]
Etymology: L, projectio, thrown forward
1 a protuberance; anything that thrusts or juts outward.
2 the act of perceiving an idea or thought as an objective reality.
3 (in psychology) an unconscious defense mechanism by which an individual attributes his or her own unacceptable traits, ideas, or impulses to another. It is noted in some stages of schizophrenia.

projection

Psychiatry A defense mechanism, operating unconsciously, in that which is emotionally unacceptable in the self is unconsciously rejected and attributed–projected–to others

pro·jec·tion

(prŏ-jek'shŭn)
1. A pushing out; an outgrowth or protuberance.
2. The referring of a sensation to the object producing it.
3. psychology/psychiatry A defense mechanism by which a repressed complex in the patient is denied and conceived as belonging to another person, as when faults that the person tends to commit are perceived in or attributed to others.
4. The conception by the consciousness of a mental occurrence belonging to the self as of external origin.
5. Localization of visual impressions in space.
6. neuroanatomy The system or systems of nerve fibers by which a group of nerve cells discharges its nerve impulses ("projects") to one or more other cell groups.
7. The image of a three-dimensional object on a plane, as in a radiograph.
8. radiography A standard x-ray study, named by body part, position, direction of the x-ray beam through the body part, or eponym.
[L. projectio; fr. pro- jicio, pp. -jectus, to throw before]

projection 

1. Localization of visual impressions from the eye to the apparent source of the stimulus, such as up and to the left. This is sometimes referred to as mental projection.
2. A prominence.
3. The imaging of an object onto a screen or a surface.
erroneous projection See false projection.
false projection The false positioning in space of a visual sensation arising from a retinal image formed in an eye with paresis of an extraocular muscle. The visual sensation appears in the direction of normal action of the paretic muscle. Example: past-pointing. Syn. erroneous projection; malprojection. See past pointing.

pro·jec·tion

(prŏ-jek'shŭn)
1. [TA] A pushing out; an outgrowth or protuberance.
2. The referring of a sensation to the object producing it.
3. System or systems of nerve fibers (projection fibers [TA]) by which a group of nerve cells discharges its nerve impulses ("projects") to one or more other cell groups.
4. In radiography, standardized views of parts of body, described by body part position or direction of the x-ray beam through body part.
[L. projectio; fr. pro- jicio, pp. -jectus, to throw before]

projection,

n orthographic, a projection made on the assumption that the projection lines from the object to the plane of projection are at right angles to the plane.
projection, gnathic planes of orthographic,
n.pl the three planes of projection to which gnathologically mounted casts are oriented: the horizontal, vertical, (frontal), and profile planes. The horizontal plane is the axis-orbital plane. The hinge axis is the line of intersection for both the horizontal and frontal planes. The profile plane is the mechanical midsagittal plane of the articulator.

projection

throwing forward, e.g. x-ray projection.

somatotopical projection
an arrangement by which a picture of the body is represented on a surface, such as projection onto the cerebral cortex of the topography of the body from which the efferent nerve impulses depart or to which afferent impulses come.

Patient discussion about projection

Q. Anyone whos doctor here and is willing to help me fillin in questionare for my project? hello, my name is edward sinanta from indonesia, i am a high school student and i would like to request an interview with you for a essay regarding the trend of health problem consultation in social networking. if you don't mind to be interviewed about this issue, please notify me through this e-mail and we can discuss the details later on. thank you for your time and attention. regards, edward

A. edward, i'm not a doctor so i can't help you ,but i hope you'll find what you are looking for and way to go on finding resources for your project!!

Q. I am getting confused with my project.. I am depressed.What can i do? Soon I will be completing my French classes. As my classes are coming close I have started developing negative mind set. I don’t understand that how my classmates are doing well. I hope they do not have any stress but I am having severe stress. I am getting scared and looks like that I may fail in my classes.. I am not able to concentrate on my classes. I am getting confused with my project. My sleep has become very difficult. I too worry about the job. I am depressed. There is no support from my classmates. Please help me what shall I do?

A. You need to find a stress reliever in your life. Think of everything from going to the gym to simple interactions with others. After you have achieved a plateau of stress relief. Sit down in a non stressful place and study. Good Luck

More discussions about projection
References in classic literature ?
A single glance showed him the truth, or at least a part of it--the steel projection that communicated the movement of the pointer upon the dial to the heart of the mechanism beneath had been severed.
A fiber rope, one end of which was tied to the boat, was made fast about a projection of the cliff face.
The disc, which the force of the projection had beaten down to the base, was removed, not without difficulty.
Five feet below me there was a sort of terrace over the semi-circular projection of a room on the ground-floor.
Beneath the trees a flat projection of rock jutted out, and formed a species of natural platform.
Further on, from the bright red windows of the Sword-Fish Inn, there came such fervent rays, that it seemed to have melted the packed snow and ice from before the house, for everywhere else the congealed frost lay ten inches thick in a hard, asphaltic pavement, --rather weary for me, when I struck my foot against the flinty projections, because from hard, remorseless service the soles of my boots were in a most miserable plight.
The stones, in falling, struck against these projections and rebounded from one to another; and the result was a series of pattering sounds that exactly imitated a rainstorm.
It was not blows, Sancho said, but that the rock had many points and projections, and that each of them had left its mark.
The far-off land may have bays, forelands, angles in and out to any number and extent; yet at a distance you see none of these (unless indeed your sun shines bright upon them revealing the projections and retirements by means of light and shade), nothing but a grey unbroken line upon the water.
The fact that Barsoomian architecture is extremely ornate made the feat much simpler than I had anticipated, since I found ornamental ledges and projections which fairly formed a perfect ladder for me all the way to the eaves of the building.
It is true that these projections were too far apart to make the balance of the ascent anything of a sinecure, but I at least had always within my reach a point of safety to which I might cling in case of accident.
Malasha, who had long been expected for supper, climbed carefully backwards down from the oven, her bare little feet catching at its projections, and slipping between the legs of the generals she darted out of the room.