proglottid

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Related to proglottids: strobila, oncosphere, cysticerci

proglottid

 [pro-glot´id]
one of the segments making up the body of a tapeworm.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

pro·glot·tid

(prō-glot'id),
One of the segments of a tapeworm, containing the reproductive organs.
Synonym(s): proglottis
[pro- + G. glōssa, tongue]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

proglottid

(prō-glŏt′ĭd) also

proglottis

(-glŏt′ĭs)
n. pl. pro·glottids also pro·glottides (-glŏt′ĭ-dēz′)
One of the segments of a tapeworm, containing both male and female reproductive organs.

pro·glot′tic, pro′glot·ti·de′an (-glŏt-ĭ-dē′ən, -glŏ-tĭd′ē-ən) adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

pro·glot·tid

(prō-glot'id)
One of the segments of a tapeworm, containing the reproductive organs.
Synonym(s): proglottis.
[pro- + G. glōssa, tongue]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

proglottid

One of the segments of a tapeworm, containing both male and female reproductive organs. The proglottides increase in size progressively as they become remote from the head of the worm.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

proglottid

one of the divisions or apparent segments of a tapeworm, formed by transverse budding in the neck region, which remain connected as they move backwards, increasing in size and maturing. Eventually the proglottid is cut off and is shed from the gut of the host. Each proglottid contains male and female sex organs.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
If excretion is not detected, further observation of the feces for discharged proglottids or eggs is needed for 2-3 more months.
Your veterinarian can examine the proglottid, or break it open to examine the eggs within to determine which type of tapeworm your cat has.
Partial proglottid fragments of individual strobila were separated and washed with distilled water to remove any ethanol remaining from the fixation process.
Proglottids (or segments) have been described as resembling cucumber seeds, pumpkin seeds, or watermelon seeds when moist, and rice grains when dried (Figure 1).
In rare circumstances, and mainly as a result of poor hygienic conditions, man may ingest either the eggs or proglottids of the parasite.
The eggs or gravid proglottids (segment of the tapeworm containing fertilized eggs) are excreted in the feces and consumed by the pig (intermediate host) to develop into larvae.
Patients may also report the passage of proglottids in the stool.
The segments of the tapeworm are called proglottids and contain male and female sex organs.
The tapeworm that occurs in horses is a large worm consisting of a head, which attaches to the intestine of the horse, and a long ribbonlike body with similar segments called proglottids. Unlike nematodes, in which the sexes are separate (males and females mate to produce the next generation), tapeworms contain both sexes within the same worm.
The body is termed as proglottids arranged in a linear series.
(1) People can be infected by eating uncooked or poorly cooked cysticercosis pork or by digesting eggs created by the adult tapeworm directly or regurgitating gravid proglottids from the human gut to the stomach.
* The adult tapeworm is about 8-10 ft (2.5-3 m), with about 1,000 proglottids (segments) that mature, become gravid, detach from the tapeworm, and migrate to the anus or are passed in the stool.