progestogen


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pro·ges·to·gen

(prō-jes'tō-jen),
1. Any agent capable of producing biologic effects similar to those of progesterone; most progestogens are steroids like the natural hormones.
2. A synthetic derivative from testosterone or progesterone that has some of the physiologic activity and pharmacologic effects of progesterone; progesterone is antiestrogenic, whereas some progestogens have estrogenic or androgenic properties in addition to progestational activity.
[pro- + gestation + G. -gen, producing]

progestogen

(prō-jĕs′tə-jən)
n.
Any of various substances having progestational effects, usually including both progesterone and the progestins.

pro·ges·to·gen

(prŏ-jes'tō-jen)
1. Any agent capable of producing biologic effects similar to those of progesterone; most progestogens are steroids like the natural hormones.
2. A synthetic derivative from testosterone or progesterone that has some of the physiologic activity and pharmacologic effects of progesterone; progesterone is antiestrogenic, whereas some progestogens have estrogenic or androgenic properties in addition to progestational activity.
Compare: bioregulator
[pro- + gestation + G. -gen, producing]

progestogen

One of a group of drugs chemically and pharmacologically similar to the natural hormone PROGESTERONE. They are used in oral contraceptives to interfere with ovulation, to alter the womb lining so that it is less receptive to a fertilized egg and to make the mucus in the cervix less readily penetrable by sperms. They are also used to treat menstrual disorders and cancers that are being promoted by oestrogens.

pro·ges·to·gen

(prŏ-jes'tō-jen)
Any agentcapable of producing biologic effects similar to those of progesterone; most are steroids, such as natural hormones.
[pro- + gestation + G. -gen, producing]
References in periodicals archive ?
The 2002 report revealed higher breast cancer risk and no cardiovascular benefit in women prescribed the combination of horse urine-derived estrogen with a synthetic progestogen used in a commonly prescribed drug called Prempro[R].
In general, from a cardiovascular viewpoint, progestogen only preparations are safer than estrogen containing drugs.4
Large, high-quality, randomized placebo-controlled trials supported the use of 17-alpha hydroxyprogesterone caproate (17-p) injections or progesterone administered vaginally, and the Ohio Department of Medicaid and Ohio Department of Health asked the Ohio PQC--a volunteer network of stakeholders dedicated to improving perinatal health outcomes--to design a statewide quality improvement project to promote progestogen prescribing for eligible women.
The sequential regimen means that estrogen (Es) is administered every day and progestogen (Pr) is used for 14 days (minimum 10 days).
For women with persistent symptoms and no history of estrogen-dependent cancers, low-dose vaginal estrogen therapy is a logical next step and does not require accompanying progestogen treatment, according to the guideline.
Pills containing one of the newer types of progestogen hormone - such as drospirenone, desogestrel, gestodene, and cyproterone - are associated with an increased risk of VTE than pills containing older progestogens such as levonorgestrel and norethisterone, it was found.
In my clinical study I have used Medroxyprogesterone acetate (Provera) 10 mg orally once per day for 7 days (as Progestogen challenge test) and Conjugated equine estrogen (Premarin) 1.25 mg orally once per day for 21 days followed by progesterone as stated above (as Estrogen/progestogen challenge test), but other options are also available for Progestogen challenge test and Estrogen/progestogen challenge test as mentioned in the table below (table 2).
The main culprit appears to be the use of a progestogen, a synthetic form of progesterone, in increasing the risk for breast cancer.
It may, however, be dependent on whether it is given as a continuous combination versus a sequential regimen, how long it is given, at what dose and how it is administered, as well as which progestogens are used.
Although there is no firm evidence that progestogen-only methods lead to weight gain, some women do report this (progestogen can increase appetite, which may account for this).
The study found that women taking pills containing a progestogen called levonorgestrel (for example, Microgynon) had the lowest risk of thrombosis.
This report focuses on contraceptives that combine estrogen and progestogen as well as the same combination used in menopause therapy.

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