proenzyme


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proenzyme

 [pro-en´zīm]
zymogen; an inactive precursor of an enzyme.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

pro·en·zyme

(prō-en'zīm),
The precursor of an enzyme, requiring some change (usually the hydrolysis of an inhibiting fragment that masks an active grouping) to render it active; for example, pepsinogen, trypsinogen, profibrolysin.
Synonym(s): zymogen
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

proenzyme

(prō-ĕn′zīm′)
n.
The inactive or nearly inactive precursor of an enzyme, converted into an active enzyme by proteolysis. Also called zymogen.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

pro·en·zyme

(prō-en'zīm)
The precursor of an enzyme, requiring some change (usually the hydrolysis of an inhibiting fragment that masks an active grouping) to render it active, e.g., pepsinogen, trypsinogen, profibrinolysin.
Synonym(s): zymogen.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

proenzyme

A protein that can give rise to an enzyme.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Modified proenzymes as artificial substrates for proteolytic enzymes: colorimetric assay of bacterial collagenase and matrix metal loproteinase activity using modified pro-urokinase.
(the Company) is developing a novel approach to prevent recurrence and metastasis of solid tumors by using pancreatic proenzymes that target and eradicate cancer stem cells in patients suffering from pancreatic, ovarian and colorectal cancers.
(4) Under normal conditions, PSA is produced as a proenzyme (proPSA) by the secretory cells that line the prostate glands (acini) and secreted into the lumen, where the propeptide is removed to generate active PSA, which can then undergo proteolysis to generate inactive unbound fPSA that enters the bloodstream.
There are three stages of regulation of proteolytic activity: transcription and secretion, proenzyme activation and activity inhibition by specific tissue inhibitors [22].
It accelerates cross-linking of fibrin by promoting the formation of a ternary complex between proenzyme FXIII, prosubstrate fibrinogen, and activator thrombin.[sup][3] The catalytic site of FXIII-A[sub]2 is Cys314, which is normally occluded by AP-FXIII.
Mann et al., "Effective activation of the proenzyme form of the urokinase-type plasminogen activator (pro-uPA) by the cysteine protease cathepsin L," FEBS Letters, vol.
uPA is a serine protease which converts the proenzyme plasminogen into the serine protease plasmin, thus making malignant cancer cells able to degrade BM and ECM.
Increased expression of pro-MMPs simply serves to elevate the amount of proenzyme available for the activation process.
One potential explanation for this finding is that caspase 8 activation cleaves Bid [26], and then the cleaved Bid activates mitochondrial Bax/Bak and contributes to multiple mitochondrial dysfunction, including the release of the intramembrane space proteins, and activation of apaf-1, which in turn cleaves the proenzyme of caspase 9 into the active form.
The conversion of the inactive proenzyme plasminogen into the active enzyme plasmin is the central step in the fibrinolytic system [6].
Law, "Proenzyme of Manduca sexta phenol oxidase: purification, activation, substrate specificity of the active enzyme, and molecular cloning," Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, vol.