prodrome

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prodrome

 [pro´drōm]
a premonitory symptom; a symptom indicating the onset of a disease. adj., adj prodro´mal, prodro´mic.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

pro·drome

(prō'drōm), The correct plural of this word is prodromes, not prodromata.
An early or premonitory symptom of a disease.
Synonym(s): prodromus
[G. prodromos, a running before, fr. pro- + dromos, a running, a course]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

prodrome

(prō′drōm′)
n.
An early symptom indicating the onset of an attack or a disease.

pro·dro′mal (-drō′məl), pro·drom′ic (-drŏm′ĭk) adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

prodrome

Medtalk A premonitory or early Sx of a disease or a disorder Neurology A premonitory Sx unrelated to a seizure  Cf Aura.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

pro·drome

(prō'drōm)
An early or premonitory symptom of a disease.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

prodrome

A symptom or sign that precedes the start of a disease and gives early warning. KOPLIK'S SPOTS are a prodrome of MEASLES and the AURA is a prodrome of an epileptic seizure or an attack of MIGRAINE.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

Prodrome

A symptom or group of symptoms that appears shortly before an acute attack of illness. The term comes from a Greek word that means "running ahead of."
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

pro·drome

(prō'drōm)
Early or premonitory symptom of a disease.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
pseudotuberculosis is an emerging pathogen in HIV patients and remind us that septicemia in these patients can exist without prodromic symptoms.
The prodromic phase of the lesions was characterized primarily by erythema.
We identified three groups of patients, which included the following: 1) those with the least severe form who had prodromic symptoms without pulmonary involvement; 2) those with moderate illness who had interstitial pulmonary infiltrates, usually needed supplemental nasal oxygen, were hemodynamically stable, and had an APACHE II <12 (none of whom died); and 3) those with the severe form who required mechanical ventilation, frequently had hemodynamic instability (93%), experienced a high mortality rate (77%), and had an APACHE II >12.
Review of medical records showed that a prodromic fever occurred in all 14 case-patients studied; dyspnea, cough, hypotension, and tachycardia occurred in about two thirds of patients; and hemorrhagic phenomena (hematuria, melena, and hypermenorrhea) in about one third.