procreate

(redirected from procreator)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.
Related to procreator: procurator, in favor of, errand

pro·cre·ate

(prō'krē-āt),
To beget; to produce by the sexual act; said usually of the male parent.
[L. pro-creo, pp. -creatus, to beget]

procreate

(prō′krē-āt′)
v. procre·ated, procre·ating, procre·ates
v.intr.
To produce offspring; reproduce.
v.tr.
To produce (offspring); reproduce.

pro′cre·ant (-ənt) adj.
pro′cre·a′tion n.
pro′cre·a′tor n.

pro·cre·ate

(prō'krē-āt')
To beget; to produce by the sexual act.
[L. pro-creo, pp. -creatus, to beget]
References in periodicals archive ?
The broad notion of the right is thus unsound, drawing curtains of liberty and privacy around prospective parents and procreators to be, as if a third person were not trapped between and made subject to them.
Yet even with these shared traits, the leading women in "Mademoiselle Scuderi" fall into three distinct categories in relation to poetic production: passive, virtuous saints and procreators; active, sexual deviants and destroyers of the family; and balanced restorers of order and creators of art.
Each merely guarantees at least an act of replacement, a specialized behavior justified and at the same time limited by interests beyond those of the procreator, by the interests of prospective children and of society.
Indeed, it was quite common for Romantic and transcendentalist poets, in particular, to talk of their fathering vis-a-vis the text, a move that allowed them to claim roles as both creators and procreators. However, given the widespread cultural pressure for women to mother, the use of the text-as-child trope is an adroit strategy, particularly when its use gave professional women greater agency.
Blue, like many Native women activists, links women's authority as procreators with their larger responsibilities to a personified, feminized Earth.
(30.) Majors and Billson observe, for instance, that "African-American men have defined manhood in terms familiar to white men: breadwinner, provider, procreator, protector." Id.
Staring death in the face in more ways than one, Nobel-laureate novelist and awe-inspiring procreator Saul Bellow, together with his friend Keith Botsford, recently embarked on an admirably quixotic quest to publish, with their own funds, News From the Republic of Letters, which they describe as a "tabloid for literates." And what is a literate?
When he recommends "Let her not walk i' th' sun," he puns on the sun as source of procreative life; the sun and son, n amely Hamlet as possible procreator; and the sun as emblem of kingship.
Laura Doyle has recently employed the term "race mother" to demonstrate how "hierarchies of race and gender require one another as co-originating and co-dependent forms of oppression" and how "these co-dependent structures of race and sex converge especially on the mother, who reproduces racial boundaries in her function as subservient procreator." Bordering on the Body: The Racial Matrix of Modern Fiction and Culture (New York: Oxford Univ.
India's fertility rate has declined since the days of that prolific procreator, but its population has nonetheless grown vastly.
Prince, the counterpoint, becomes the positive life-force, lover of both Midra and her mother Peata; he is also the father of the two main children in the novel, Hartseed (his mother is Midra) and Christine, inhabiting women's lives in a sense as procreator, and even beyond after being killed by the white plantation owners.
In our society, women are primarily seen to be homemaker and procreator. Consequently, differential socialization of the sexes towards aspiring for and accepting occupational roles regarded as appropriate for men and women, limit the career opinions for them.