procreative


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pro·cre·a·tive

(prō'krē-ā-tiv),
Having the power to beget or procreate.

procreative

(prō′krē-ā′tĭv)
adj.
1. Capable of reproducing; generative.
2. Of or relating to procreation: the procreative instinct.

pro·cre·a·tive

(prō'krē-ā'tiv)
Having the power to beget or procreate.
References in periodicals archive ?
The church condemns any sex acts--including those engaged in by married couples--that do not respect the procreative norm.
The traditional claim is rather subtler: that the unitive and procreative purposes of sex are so tightly woven together by nature that splitting them apart comes at a high cost to individuals and society.
12) of the "inseparable connection" between "the unitive significance and the procreative significance" of a conjugal act as meaning that it is immoral to break this connection through a human act that is deliberately and intentionally directed to preventing the procreative consequences of a conjugal act.
About meaningful difference between plants we can say: the corn is higher and more preferable than millet and sorghum due to stem and procreative organ dry weight, with consideration of height and diameter of corn stem and big maize and the height of plant mass.
Just how far does the procreative liberty protected by the Constitution extend?
22) The right to privacy covers two main areas that apply to the Talty case: the right to make procreative decisions and the right to privacy in sexual behavior.
The meaning of the marriage act derives not from human choice or even human convention but from its procreative character.
John, the story's narrator, is a feckless ne'er do well and aspiring writer who drinks for two, dotes on his niece and is having an affair with his sister in law -difficult enough under normal circumstances, never mind when sex involves a discreetly draped sheet and one of the heads agreeing to listen to CDs while the other is given charge of the procreative equipment.
It posits that the procreative right, properly stated, includes at least the act of replacing oneself and at most procreation up to a point that optimizes the public good.
I see the ethical challenges not in the reproductive right to use ARTs, but in the case-by-case procreative decisions about their application.
And then the killer sign-off: "Even a nun in a 500 seems to telegraph a faint tingle of the procreative urge.