procoagulant

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procoagulant

 [pro″co-ag´u-lant]
1. tending to promote coagulation.
2. a precursor of a natural substance necessary to coagulation of the blood.

procoagulant

(prō′kō-ăg′yə-lənt)
n.
1. The precursor of any of various blood factors necessary for coagulation.
2. An agent that promotes the coagulation of blood.

procoagulant

adjective Favoring coagulation; referring to activation of coagulation factors noun Any agent–eg, thrombin, factor Xa, which clots blood
References in periodicals archive ?
Junke et al., "Once versus twice daily injection of enoxaparin for thromboprophylaxis in bariatric surgery: effects on antifactor Xa activity and procoagulant microparticles.
Gerlach et al., "Vascular permeability factor: a tumor-derived polypeptide that induces endothelial cell and monocyte procoagulant activity, and promotes monocyte migration," Journal of Experimental Medicine, vol.
Platelets provide a procoagulant surface for amplification of cancer-related coagulation.
It is currently widely accepted that a protein S deficiency is a significant contributor to the procoagulant nature of HIV disease.
(3) In vertebrates, clotting and inflammation have diverged into the specialized functions of the platelets, phagocytic cells (neutrophils and macrophages), and several plasma protein systems (procoagulant proteins, complement proteins, proteins of the kinin system).
Hence, there is a decrease in both procoagulant and anticoagulant proteins.
Thrombin generation in TF-activated plasma requires the presence of procoagulant phospholipid membranes for the assembly of thrombin-generating enzyme complexes (17).
The latter could be taken as an index of thrombin generation reflecting the overall balance of procoagulants and anticoagulants of plasma ex vivo.
[7] Procoagulant activity has been shown to be associated with stage of the disease.
The first, represented by the procoagulant factors, is triggered by tissue factor (TF), (3) a cellular receptor in damaged tissues that forms a complex with activated factor VII (FVIIa) at the site of injury (Fig.
After liver resection, a degree of hepatic insufficiency can result in reduced levels of procoagulant and anticoagulant factors normally synthesised in the liver.