prochiral


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pro·chi·ral

(prō-kī'răl),
Refers to an atom in a molecule (usually a carbon atom) that would become chiral if one of two identical substituents is replaced by a new ligand; that is, an atom that has two enantiotopic groups linked to it. For example, carbon-1 of ethanol is a prochiral carbon.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Guisan, Kinetically Controlled Synthesis of Monoglyceryl Esters from Chiral and Prochiral Acids Methyl Esters Catalyzed by Immobilized Rhizomucor Miehei Lipase, Bioresour.
One of the most popular biocatalyst classes has been ketoreductases (KREDs), which have been popularly used as an asymmetric catalyst to reduce prochiral ketones into optically pure alcohols [4].
A remarkable effect of the support on the enantioselectivity of catalytic hydrogenation of prochiral alkenes," Journal of the Chemical Society--Series Chemical Communications, no.
A topological rule for C, C-bond forming processes between prochiral centres.
The differentiation of two enantiotopic groups in the prochiral glycerol molecule would in fact lead to chiral molecules, which could be transformed in both enantiomers of glycerol derivatives by selective functional group manipulation [3].
Further, the prochiral nature of glycerol means that such building blocks also can be prepared in optically pure form and used in the synthesis of numerous biologically important natural and non-natural products.
Finally, the stereochemical control of the prochiral reductions increased from 6.8 to 34.2 % enantiomeric excess.
In this report, we extend this idea that the microenvironment of a polymer or dendrimer may be manipulated to prepare reagents capable of reducing prochiral ketones to secondary alcohols with moderate to high stereoselectivities.
Metallocenes have been designed that enchain prochiral monomers like propylene in atactic, isotactic, syndiotactic and hemi-isotactic orientations.
Asymmetric oxidation of prochiral and racemic ketones using chiral catalysts has been almost neglected by researchers.