procedural memory


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procedural memory

mental retention involving presemantic perception, processing visuospatial information, and affective valence, allowing recall of skills needed for ADLs. Compare: autobiographic memory.

pro·ce·du·ral mem·o·ry

(prǒ-sē'jŭr-al mem'ŏr-ē)
Knowledge needed to perform the procedures composing a given task.

procedural memory

The ability to recall how to perform activities or functions, e.g., how to brush one's teeth or ride a skateboard. This type of memory is often preserved when other memory functions are lost.
See: declarative memory
See also: memory
References in periodicals archive ?
when the utilization ratio of procedural rules denoted by pc in the procedural memory are lower than the critical ratio denoted by [P.
As Ruden (2007) explains, emotional states like fear and rage and their bodily states in inescapable and unpleasant situations are stored in procedural memory and encoded as the content of the unconscious mind.
This is no doubt an example of Lou's procedural memory warning him of danger.
Procedural memory abilities, often referred to as implicit memory, involve more rote or unconscious recollections (e.
Similarly, the interaction between procedural memory and declarative memory as part of the neurobiology of memory consolidation should inform this understanding.
Don't forget the importance of movement and role play for strengthening procedural memory and developing a healthier, more active student.
These findings suggest that slow-wave triggers procedural memory formation whereas REM sleep amplifies that process Maquet remarks.
As used clinically by psychologists, the term "amnesia" usually refers to a specific form of memory loss, sometimes arising from viral infections of the brain, strokes, head injury, or Korsakov's Alcoholic Syndrome, in which a patient is left with a functioning short-term memory, semantic IQ, intact procedural memory and other cognitive abilities, but with dense permanent anterior-grade amnesia (in which the patient is impaired in acquiring new knowledge) and some degree of retrograde amnesia (in which the patient has some impairment of the ability to recall events which occurred prior to the onset of the amnesia).
He retained implicit (nondeclarative) memory, such as procedural memory, so he had the ability to learn new and remember previously learned skills and procedures; however, he could not learn any new facts.
Procedural memory refers to the learning of motor and cognitive skills, and is characterized by gradual, incremental learning (Cohen & Eichenbaum, 1993).
Amnesia-inducing brain damage affects these structures, she theorizes, but not those needed for procedural memory, which handles skills and knowledge employed without conscious effort.
Researchers in the field of procedural memory consolidation have systematically examined the process in both rats and humans.