procedural learning

procedural learning,

n term used in the Feldenkrais method; refers to the preverbal stage of knowledge acquisition in which a baby relates to the surroundings in an essentially non-verbal, nonanalytical fashion. See also method, Feldenkrais.
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It can be inferred that, during learning, the frequency of cues is more effective than viewing them (cognitive load and procedural learning and imitation).
The twenty contributions that make up the main body of the text are devoted to an online marketing strategies assessment for companies in the airline and entertainment industries operating in Malaysia, consumer acceptance of internet banking, student acceptance of YouTube videos for procedural learning, and many other related subjects.
Role of conceptual knowledge in mathematical procedural learning.
While didactic and procedural learning increased, the proportion of the day spent on child-selected activity declined.
also at Geisel, said the impact on procedural memory "perhaps is the worst side effect" of benzodiazepines in the treatment of anxiety "Research that has successfully pulled apart explicit and implicit memory has demonstrated significant effects on procedural learning and memory" during treatment with benzodiazepines, she said.
Procedural learning belongs to the realm of motor learning, where musicians, dancers, athletes, and others who depend upon a high level of motor skill practice their art.
Instead of measuring how brain activity differs before and after subjects learn a complex task, the researchers analyzed background activity in the basal ganglia, a group of brain structures known to be important for procedural learning, coordinated movement and feelings of reward.
Instead of measuring how brain activity differs before and after subjects learn a complex task, the researchers analysed background activity in the basal ganglia, a group of brain structures known to be important for procedural learning, coordinated movement and feelings of reward.
Procedural memory, like semantic memory, is not dependent on the hippocampus or related structures; indeed, amnesic patients do not show impairments in the various types of procedural learning and memory tasks described earlier.
Ericsson has described the concept of deliberate practice, which is fundamental to procedural learning.
We presume that, since both hippocampi were available for encoding, and because procedural learning, known to be independent of hippocampal integrity, was not disrupted, subjects improved their performance in the remaining trials of the session (trials 2, 3 and 4).
And because procedural learning is more limited in applicability than declarative learning, it is "inferior' learning, to the extent that it is less capable of being manipulated, organized, and applied to new and unfamiliar situations than declarative learning.