prokaryote

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prokaryote

 [pro-kar´e-ōt]
any member of the kingdom Monera; a unicellular organism lacking a true nucleus and nuclear membrane, having genetic material composed of a single loop of naked double-stranded DNA. The microorganisms, comprising the bacteria and blue-green bacteria (formerly blue-green algae), are predominantly unicellular but may have filamentous, mycelial, or colonial forms. Prokaryotes, with the exception of genus Mycoplasma, have a rigid cell wall. adj., adj prokaryot´ic.

pro·kar·y·ote

(prō-kar'ē-ōt),
A member of the superkingdom Prokaryotae; an organismic unit consisting of a single and presumably primitive moneran cell, or a precellular organism, which lacks a nuclear membrane, paired organized chromosomes, a mitotic mechanism for cell division, microtubules, and mitochondria.
See also: Prokaryotae, Monera, eukaryote.
Synonym(s): procaryote

prokaryote

also

procaryote

(prō-kăr′ē-ōt′)
n.
Any of various microorganisms of the domains Archaea and Bacteria, characterized by the absence of a distinct membrane-bound nucleus and membrane-bound organelles and by the simultaneous occurrence of DNA transcription and protein synthesis at the same site, in contrast to eukaryotes. Also called moneran.

pro·kar′y·ot′ic (-ŏt′ĭk) adj.

pro·kar·y·ote

(prō-kar'ē-ōt)
A member of the superkingdom Prokaryotae; an organism consisting of a single cell, or a precellular organism, which lacks a nuclear membrane, paired organized chromosomes, a mitotic mechanism for cell division, microtubules, and mitochondria.
See also: eukaryote
Synonym(s): procaryote.

prokaryote

or

prokaryote

any organism, including those in the domains BACTERIA or ARCHAEA, that lacks a membrane-bound nucleus and has no MITOSIS or MEIOSIS. Organelles such as the MITOCHONDRION and the ENDOPLASMIC RETICULUM are also lacking. Compare EUKARYOTE and See Fig. 155 .
References in periodicals archive ?
(133) Heerey J held that the claim to the product of procaryotic or eucaryotic expression of an exogenous DNA sequence was permissibly wide because the DNA sequence for EPO was a principle of general application and, therefore, it was acceptable for the claim to be made in correspondingly general terms.
The serine, threonine and/or tyrosine protein phosphatases of procaryotic organisms: a family portrait.
We eucaryotes, we large animals, we brainy animals, are a recent wart on the face of a biosphere which is still fundamentally, and predominantly, procaryotic. To the extent that average size/complexity/cell number/brain size has increased since the "age of bacteria," this could be simply because the wall of possibilities constrains the drunkard from moving in any other direction.
Procaryotic cells do not have a true nucleus, the bacteria's DNA being present as a single molecule in the cell's interior.
For example, Paul Berg's colleagues created one of the first transgenic organisms when in 1971 they used restriction enzymes and plasmid vectors to insert genetic elements from Simian Virus 40 into Escherichia coli.[6] These early techniques were unidirectional, that is, they allowed the introduction of genetic material from any foreign source into bacterial (procaryotic) systems.