pro-choice


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pro-choice

adjective Referring to the belief that women should have the right to choose abortion.
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The recent increase in the pro-choice side has occurred almost equally among men and women.
However, because there are more prochoice than pro-life registered voters (50% to 44%), this equates to 11% of all registered voters saying they will only vote for prolife candidates and 8% saying they will only vote for pro-choice candidates--not a great advantage or disadvantage for either side.
It's getting hard for that to happen," he said of a pro-choice Republican winning a big primary race.
Wade, but that's not all it takes to be a pro-choice candidate.
THIS WILL NOT BE, however, the first time staunchly pro-life and staunchly pro-choice partisans have had civil conversations about areas of potential agreement or even common action.
Giuliani, whose support for abortion rights has long been part of his political persona, angered some pro-choice activists when he said it would be ''OK'' if Roe vs.
He's openly gay, he's pro-choice, but he has a great record supporting Social Security reform and free trade.
On the other hand, Bishop Richard Malone of Portland, ME has stated that pro-choice politicians should not be excommunicated but required to be "engaged in dialogue (M.
It's futile, they insist, and it makes the pro-choice movement look extreme.
In 1989, she helped Doug Wilder become governor of Virginia, overriding pro-choice purists who objected to Wilder's support of mandatory parental consent for teenagers' abortions.
Even as many pro-choice people have been worrying about the potential calamity that awaits in the Supreme Court, the antiabortion forces have been busy gaining ground elsewhere.