privilege


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privilege

(prĭv′ĭ-lĭj) [L. privilegium, law affecting a single person, prerogative]
1. A right granted to a person in recognition of some special status, e.g., a right to practice one's profession in a health care facility.
2. An immunity from commonly imposed standards or laws.
References in classic literature ?
Certains droits et privileges de la noblesse me paraissent etre des moyens de soutenir ce sentiment."*
Certain rights and privileges for the aristocracy appear to me a means of maintaining that sentiment."
Speranski went on to say that honor, l'honeur, cannot be upheld by privileges harmful to the service; that honor, l'honneur, is either a negative concept of not doing what is blameworthy or it is a source of emulation in pursuit of commendation and rewards, which recognize it.
"I do not dispute that, but it cannot be denied that court privileges have attained the same end," returned Prince Andrew.
It would not be very long before the middle classes in their turn would be looked upon by the people as a sort of noblesse; they would be a sorry kind of noblesse, it is true, but their wealth and privileges would seem so much the more hateful in the eyes of the people because they would have a closer vision of these things.
But suppose a kind of social tabula rasa, every social unit perfectly equal, an increase of population everywhere in the same ratio, and give the same amount of land to each family; it would not be long before you would again have all the existing inequalities of fortune; it is glaringly evident, therefore, that there are such things as superiority of fortune, of thinking capacity, and of power, and we must make up our minds to this fact; but the masses will always regard rights that have been most honestly acquired as privileges, and as a wrong done to themselves.
I had not had the privilege of sitting down to a dining-table until I was quite well grown.
Washington and myself a reception, at which we had the privilege of meeting some of the best people in England.
It was a great privilege to meet throughout England those who had known and honoured the late William Lloyd Garrison, the Hon.
This large work could not be accomplished if the badge-holders stood upon their privilege and ceased to volunteer.
Many little privileges were taken away from it, while its wages and its standard of living steadily sank down.
One group of students, after reading Jensen's article, expressed their acceptance to the idea of 'White Privilege." I call these responses the "Acceptance Group." However, this group consisted of very few students.