privacy


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pri·va·cy

(prī'vă-sē),
1. Being apart from others; seclusion; secrecy.
2. Especially in psychiatry and clinical psychology, respect for the confidential nature of the therapist-patient relationship.

privacy

[prī′vəsē]
a culturally specific concept defining the degree of one's personal responsibility to others in regulating behavior that is regarded as intrusive. Some privacy-regulating mechanisms are physical barriers (closed doors or drawn curtains, such as around a hospital bed) and interpersonal types (lowered voices or cessation of smoking).
enlarge picture
Privacy curtains help ensure patient's privacy

privacy

Seclusion, freedom from disturbance or interference. Privacy has two intertwined components in the context of healthcare:
(1) The patient’s rights and expectations that personal health information is shared only between professionals who need it to manage the patient; in the UK access to such information is monitored by the provider’s Caldicott Guardian; and
(2) The physical space, clothing and other measures taken to ensure that the private conversations remain so, and that patients’ dignity is preserved and embarrassment minimised by providing appropriate clothing.

Pronunciation
Medspeak-UK: pronounced, PRIV uh see
Medspeak-US: pronounced, PRY vuh see

privacy

NIHspeak Control over the extent, timing, and circumstances of sharing oneself–physically, behaviorally, or intellectually with others

pri·va·cy

(prī'vă-sē)
1. Being apart from others; seclusion; secrecy.
2. Especially in psychiatry and clinical psychology, respect for the confidential nature of the therapist-patient relationship.

pri·va·cy

(prī'vă-sē)
1. Being apart from others; seclusion; secrecy.
2. Especially in psychiatry and clinical psychology, but also in all fields of dentistry and health care, respect for confidential nature of the clinician-patient relationship.

privacy,

n a culturally specific concept defining the degree of one's personal responsibility to others in regulating behavior that is regarded as intrusive.

Patient discussion about privacy

Q. I am upset by the lack of privacy at dialysis centers. Does anyone see their nephrologist in private office? My nephrologist comes to see me and examine me while I am receiving dialysis. I understand his talking to me but the exam is objectionable and I am unable to ask personal questions because everyone is listening. I am told they are all old and don't hear us but that is patronizing and extremely rude. Are there rules against this? Why can't we have office visits where there is some privacy?

A. I live in Sault Ste Marie Ontario Canada and if you need to ask personal questions you can make an appointment to see your doctor in the clinic.
But when I was in Calgary Alberta they would make you a appointment every 3 months to see the doctor.

More discussions about privacy
References in periodicals archive ?
For example, the country has provincial and federal privacy commissioners who oversee the rules and help educate consumers and industries about privacy issues.
Accountants in both industry and public practice can use the framework to guide organizations in developing their email privacy policies.
Now JetBlue is facing lawsuits over the apparent breach of its privacy policy, which assured its Web customers that "financial and personal information collected on this site is not shared with any third parties.
The HIPAA privacy rule * creates new rights for individuals to have access to their health information and medical records (referred to as "protected health information"), to obtain copies and to request corrections.
In a briefing to congressional staff on August 19, 2002, Jim Pyles, a medical privacy expert, wrote that: "The privacy rule applies to covered entities and their business associates.
Users can generate a list of company privacy policies that provide an opt-in or opt-out option for any of these terms, depending on their requirements.
Back in 1982, the National Association of Insurance Commissioners developed the Insurance Information and Privacy Protection Model Act.
A facility's privacy policy must include information relating to the uses and disclosures of the individual's PHI, including a description and one example for each of the types of uses and disclosures that the facility is permitted to make for the purposes of treatment, payment, and healthcare operations; a description of each of the other purposes that the facility is permitted or required to perform without consent, such as public health, governmental health oversight, judicial and administrative proceedings, law enforcement, and work-related illness or injury; and enough detail to clarify the uses and disclosures that are permitted or required by the Privacy Rule or other applicable laws.
It outlaws certain kinds of statements on bulletin boards maintained as part of the official municipal Web site, including: statements that infringe on an individual's privacy, defamatory statements, discriminatory statements and sexually arousing comments.
Some state laws and some federal regulations--such as OBRA--call for broader or more stringent measures than those outlined in the HIPAA Privacy Rule.