principle

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principle

 [prin´sĭ-p'l]
1. a chemical component.
2. a substance on which certain of the properties of a drug depend.
3. an accepted or professed rule of action or conduct; in a given philosophical system it is a fundamental or general law or truth from which others are derived. In bioethics some important principles are beneficence, justice, nonmaleficence, and respect for autonomy; these are derived in part from professional roles and traditions.
active principle any constituent of a drug that helps to confer upon it a medicinal property.
Bobath p's a type of neurophysiological rehabilitation; see bobath method.
Bohr's principle of complementarity reflexes do not independently account for the complex nature of infant behavior.
negentropic principle a principle of general systems theory stating that open systems have mechanisms that slow down or arrest the process of movement toward less efficiency and growth. Negentropy (negative entropy) is the tendency toward order and organization.
pleasure principle (pleasure-pain principle) in psychoanalytic theory, an inborn tendency to avoid pain and seek pleasure through the immediate reduction of tension by either direct or fantasied gratification.
reality principle in psychoanalytic theory, the ego functions that modify the demands of the pleasure principle to meet the demands and requirements of the external world.

prin·ci·ple

(prin'si-pĕl), Do not confuse this word with principal.
1. A general or fundamental doctrine or tenet.
See also: law, rule, theorem.
2. The essential ingredient in a substance, especially one that gives it its distinctive quality or effect.
[L. principium, a beginning, fr. princeps, chief]

principle

/prin·ci·ple/ (prin´sip'l)
1. a chemical component.
2. a substance on which certain of the properties of a drug depend.
3. a law of conduct.

principle of infinitesimal dose  a fundamental principle of homeopathy: the more a remedy is diluted (even to the point that none of the medicinal substance is likely to be present), the more powerful and longer lasting will be its effect.
yin/yang principle  in Chinese philosophy, the concept of polar complements existing in dynamic equilibrium and always present simultaneously. In traditional Chinese medicine, a disturbance of the proper balance of yin and yang causes disease, and the goal is to maintain or to restore this balance.

principle

[prin′sipəl]
Etymology: L, principium, foundation
1 a general truth or established rule of action.
2 a prime source or element from which anything proceeds.
3 a law on which others are founded or from which others are derived.

principle

Vox populi A guiding rule or maxim. See Bateman's principle, Bolam principle, Ceiling principle, Dale's principle, Eggshell skull principle, Fortner principle, Handicap principle, Heuristic principle, Homeopathic principle, KISS principle, Mendelian principle, Pleasure principle, Polluter pays principle, PRICE principle, Reality principle.

prin·ci·ple

(prin'si-pĕl)
1. A general or fundamental doctrine or tenet.
See also: law, rule, theorem
2. The essential ingredient in a substance, especially one that gives it its distinctive quality or effect.
[L. principium, a beginning, fr. princeps, chief]

prin·ci·ple

(prin'si-pĕl)
1. A general or fundamental doctrine or tenet.
2. Essential ingredient in a substance.
[L. principium, a beginning, fr. princeps, chief]

principle

1. a chemical component.
2. a substance on which certain of the properties of a drug depend.
3. a law of conduct.

active principle
any constituent of a drug that helps to confer upon it a medicinal property.
reasonable person principle
the basis for many decisions in cases alleging negligence. The court bases its judgment on what it considers a reasonable person, a reasonable veterinarian in our context, would have done in the circumstances. This is the evidence that most expert witnesses are asked to give, evidence about what should be expected of a member of their profession in terms of quality of performance. Called also principle of the reasonable person.
References in periodicals archive ?
With O'Connor's graceful guidance, readers should have no problem determining what principles guide their own families toward holiness.
While it is mandatory for ESCO's to comply with the New York Uniform Business Practices, this statement of principles is voluntary and is specifically targeted at preempting many potential concerns customers participating in the deregulated energy market might have.
Under the aegis of Sudanese diplomat Francis Deng, the United Nations developed the Guiding Principles in 1998, since the existing international treaties mentioned above all contained gaps in coverage, especially for internally displaced persons.
A more systematic approach proceeding from fundamental principles would have produced a better teaching manual.
Moral intelligence is the thoughtful application of objective but not absolute modern-day ethical principles to specific fact situations, in order to predict possible long-range effects of our actions on ourselves and others.
The researchers explored what principles family camps are based on and how those camps are teaching those principles to families.
Thus, while mPBL has the same goals as PBL it differs from this pure form by incorporating critical elements such as collaborative team-based learning, Triple-Jump Competency learning and empowerment principles and practices.
Hans Kung points out that one of the principles basic to most religions and moral systems is the Golden Rule: Do unto others as you would have them do unto you (1998, p.
As the World Book Dictionary indicates, a discipline is probably a science if it is any activity that is the product of a prescribed process or working principles gained by education and/or training.
Session 2 -- Developing an In-Depth Understanding of Lean Principles and Concepts
Applying this figure to their differing principles may diffuse the debate between Singer and Arthur.
FASB anticipates issuing a final standard entitled Hierarchy of Accounting Principles by the end of 2005, moving the authority of generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP) fully to FASB from previously being a function of the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants' (AICPA) auditing standards.

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