principle


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Related to principle: principal

principle

 [prin´sĭ-p'l]
1. a chemical component.
2. a substance on which certain of the properties of a drug depend.
3. an accepted or professed rule of action or conduct; in a given philosophical system it is a fundamental or general law or truth from which others are derived. In bioethics some important principles are beneficence, justice, nonmaleficence, and respect for autonomy; these are derived in part from professional roles and traditions.
active principle any constituent of a drug that helps to confer upon it a medicinal property.
Bobath p's a type of neurophysiological rehabilitation; see bobath method.
Bohr's principle of complementarity reflexes do not independently account for the complex nature of infant behavior.
negentropic principle a principle of general systems theory stating that open systems have mechanisms that slow down or arrest the process of movement toward less efficiency and growth. Negentropy (negative entropy) is the tendency toward order and organization.
pleasure principle (pleasure-pain principle) in psychoanalytic theory, an inborn tendency to avoid pain and seek pleasure through the immediate reduction of tension by either direct or fantasied gratification.
reality principle in psychoanalytic theory, the ego functions that modify the demands of the pleasure principle to meet the demands and requirements of the external world.

prin·ci·ple

(prin'si-pĕl), Do not confuse this word with principal.
1. A general or fundamental doctrine or tenet.
See also: law, rule, theorem.
2. The essential ingredient in a substance, especially one that gives it its distinctive quality or effect.
[L. principium, a beginning, fr. princeps, chief]

principle

/prin·ci·ple/ (prin´sip'l)
1. a chemical component.
2. a substance on which certain of the properties of a drug depend.
3. a law of conduct.

principle of infinitesimal dose  a fundamental principle of homeopathy: the more a remedy is diluted (even to the point that none of the medicinal substance is likely to be present), the more powerful and longer lasting will be its effect.
yin/yang principle  in Chinese philosophy, the concept of polar complements existing in dynamic equilibrium and always present simultaneously. In traditional Chinese medicine, a disturbance of the proper balance of yin and yang causes disease, and the goal is to maintain or to restore this balance.

principle

[prin′sipəl]
Etymology: L, principium, foundation
1 a general truth or established rule of action.
2 a prime source or element from which anything proceeds.
3 a law on which others are founded or from which others are derived.

principle

Vox populi A guiding rule or maxim. See Bateman's principle, Bolam principle, Ceiling principle, Dale's principle, Eggshell skull principle, Fortner principle, Handicap principle, Heuristic principle, Homeopathic principle, KISS principle, Mendelian principle, Pleasure principle, Polluter pays principle, PRICE principle, Reality principle.

prin·ci·ple

(prin'si-pĕl)
1. A general or fundamental doctrine or tenet.
See also: law, rule, theorem
2. The essential ingredient in a substance, especially one that gives it its distinctive quality or effect.
[L. principium, a beginning, fr. princeps, chief]

prin·ci·ple

(prin'si-pĕl)
1. A general or fundamental doctrine or tenet.
2. Essential ingredient in a substance.
[L. principium, a beginning, fr. princeps, chief]

principle

1. a chemical component.
2. a substance on which certain of the properties of a drug depend.
3. a law of conduct.

active principle
any constituent of a drug that helps to confer upon it a medicinal property.
reasonable person principle
the basis for many decisions in cases alleging negligence. The court bases its judgment on what it considers a reasonable person, a reasonable veterinarian in our context, would have done in the circumstances. This is the evidence that most expert witnesses are asked to give, evidence about what should be expected of a member of their profession in terms of quality of performance. Called also principle of the reasonable person.
References in classic literature ?
Confucius said: "If a state is governed by the principles of reason, poverty and misery are subjects of shame; if a state is not governed by the principles of reason, riches and honors are subjects of shame.
By the fundamental principle of Christianity, the happiness of the individual is interwoven, by innumerable and imperceptible ties, with that of his contemporaries.
And further, I continued to exercise myself in the method I had prescribed; for, besides taking care in general to conduct all my thoughts according to its rules, I reserved some hours from time to time which I expressly devoted to the employment of the method in the solution of mathematical difficulties, or even in the solution likewise of some questions belonging to other sciences, but which, by my having detached them from such principles of these sciences as were of inadequate certainty, were rendered almost mathematical: the truth of this will be manifest from the numerous examples contained in this volume.
Referring the examination of the principle itself to another place, as has been already mentioned, it will be sufficient to remark here that, in the sense of the author who has been most emphatically quoted upon the occasion, it would only dictate a reduction of the SIZE of the more considerable MEMBERS of the Union, but would not militate against their being all comprehended in one confederate government.
The Conformity of the Plan to Republican Principles For the Independent Journal.
He was as religious as they, as stern and inflexible, and as deeply imbued with democratic principles.
The principle of "tools to those who can use them" ought to lead him, as it does Plato, to an aristocracy.
And no matter how much he dissected beauty in search of the principles that underlie beauty and make beauty possible, he was aware, always, of the innermost mystery of beauty to which he did not penetrate and to which no man had ever penetrated.
I can't help that," the Man of Principle replied, with that lofty scorn of practical considerations distinguishing his species.
The great power of this principle of selection is not hypothetical.
Well then, tell me, I said, whether I am right or not: You remember the original principle which we were always laying down at the foundation of the State, that one man should practise one thing only, the thing to which his nature was best adapted;-- now justice is this principle or a part of it.
To give a higher idea of the principle I mean, as well as one more familiar to the present age; it may be considered as sitting on its throne in the mind, like the Lord High Chancellor of this kingdom in his court; where it presides, governs, directs, judges, acquits, and condemns according to merit and justice, with a knowledge which nothing escapes, a penetration which nothing can deceive, and an integrity which nothing can corrupt.