principal

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principal

[prin′sipəl]
Etymology: L, principalis, first in rank
first in authority or importance.

principal

A fully qualified and registered general practitioner in the UK, who has a direct contract with a Health Authority to provide general medical services.

principal,

adj the leader; highest in rank; the source of authority.
principal in law of agency,
n the employer; the person who gives authority to an agent to act for him.
References in periodicals archive ?
Gooden is an associate professor and director of the Principalship Program in the Department of Educational Administration of the College of Education at the University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas.
Public schools privilege males through power in leadership positions such as the principalship (Blackmore and Kenway 1993; Chase 1995; Clement 1980; Hall 1999; Hanson and Tyack 1981; Shakeshaft 1989).
A book on the principalship argues against a single salary schedule, equal pay for equal work, because "a beginning salary of $4,000 makes a might attractive income for the unmarried women, particularly if she chooses to live at home, which some of them do.
Here, our aim was to identify aspirants' perceptions of careers and the principalship, as part of which we sought to establish why they were pursuing the principalship as a career goal.
Today, fewer teachers are aspiring to the principalship (Fenwick & Pierce, 2001; Moos, 1999; Rayfield & Diamantes, 2003).
Several researchers attribute the disinterest in the principalship to complexities of the job, the ever-increasing workload, long hours, and stress associated with the job (Holdaway, 1999; Moos, 1999) and insufficient compensation (Cusick, 2003; NAESP, 2005).
First, this view raises the possibility that it is precisely the overwhelming expectations that currently deter those who otherwise would have aspired to the principalship - hence enlarging the supply problem.
If prompted, veteran principals will tell you that the expectations associated with the principalship have mushroomed over the past 20 years.
These data suggest that there is a strong revolving door between teaching and the principalship (Papa et al.
At the dawn of this millennium, the challenges for secondary schools and principals in the United States include changing demographics, schools and curricula that are inappropriately designed for today's adolescents, principals trained to be managers rather than instructional leaders, and a dramatic shortage of qualified candidates willing to take on the principalship.
Wylie (1997) also found women were twice as likely as men to be appointed as teaching principals in the smallest schools and half as likely to be appointed to non-teaching principalships in larger schools; 59 percent of the women appointed went to rural schools compared with 42 per cent of the men and only 27 per cent of the women went to major city schools; 70 percent of the women principals were teaching principals, but only 28 per cent of the male principals.
In the Northern Territory and the Australian Capital Territory, contracts for principalships are advertised nationally and there is a steady trickle of interstate appointees.