primitive

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primitive

 [prim´ĭ-tiv]
first in point of time; existing in a simple or early form that shows little complexity.

prim·i·tive

(prim'i-tiv),
Obsolete usage in embryology, replace by primordial.
[L. primitivus, fr. primus, first]

primitive

adjective Embrology Undifferentiated; undeveloped; before development of 1º germ layers–ectoderm, endoderm, mesoderm Psychiatry Pertaining to the early development of the personality

pri·mor·di·al

(prī-mōr'dē-ăl)
1. Relating to a primordium.
2. Relating to a structure in its first or earliest stage of development.
Synonym(s): primal (2) , primitive.

primitive

of ancient origin but present in modern organisms in an unmodified and unspecialized form.
References in periodicals archive ?
In other words, they manifested a raw primitiveness full of potential.
Tyro helmer Issabayeva, founder and president of Kazakhstan's Sun Production, captures the unadorned primitiveness and beauty of the land and its people.
Dunbar is well aware of the role that the language of primitiveness plays in racism, and here he is playing with and inverting the dichotomy of civilized/primitive.
Johnson attempted to explain his artistic philosophy as follows: "My aim is to express in a natural way what I feel, what is in me, both rhythmically and spiritually, all that which in time has been saved up in my family of primitiveness and tradition, and which is now concentrated in me."
"Prescientific" connotes an ethnocentric distinction between the alleged primitiveness of the Wendat and Haudenosaunee and the sophistication or, perhaps, even the truth, of modern Western knowledge.
Contemptuous of anything that smacks of the "Idea of Progress"--the notion that "mankind has advanced over the centuries through quickening stages of development, from primitiveness and barbarism to enlightenment and civilization"--he is scathingly critical of those who advocate policies rooted in utopian expectations.
I quickly realised that it is the very primitiveness and childlike quality of Lowry's pictures that lends them their appeal, no matter how many times you have seen the same factory scene hanging in a hotel reception or someone's living room.
[and reveal] a degree of primitiveness which should not be tolerated in a modern and civilised community' (Wayfarer 1943).
In narrating, reporting, and memorializing their manifold experiences, German women appropriated the masculine and racist discourse of conquest and colonization, of Reich modernity over ethnic backwardness and Polish primitiveness, and of emerging German order triumphing over Polish chaos.
Conrad implies that the solution to the characters' relocation--be it that of Razumov, Jim or Kurtz--is neither to be sought in the absolute present of Russia nor in the radical primitiveness of Patusan or the African Jungle.
Carol Smith notes that she forces men "to realize the primitiveness of their desire and the fragility of male bonding when threatened by lust, sexual need, or competition for a woman" (Bloom 54).
The existence of fossils proved that the earth was old beyond comprehension, implying a new conception of "deep time," but their primitiveness also proved that as life had evolved, it had become more complex, from the earliest one-celled organisms to plants, amphibians, animals, mammals, and man.