primitive

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primitive

 [prim´ĭ-tiv]
first in point of time; existing in a simple or early form that shows little complexity.

prim·i·tive

(prim'i-tiv),
Obsolete usage in embryology, replace by primordial.
[L. primitivus, fr. primus, first]

primitive

/prim·i·tive/ (prim´ĭ-tiv) first in point of time; existing in a simple or early form that shows little complexity.

primitive

[prim′itiv]
Etymology: L, primivus
1 undeveloped; undifferentiated; rudimentary; showing little or no evolution.
2 embryonic; formed early in the course of development; existing in an early or simple form. Compare definitive.

primitive

adjective Embrology Undifferentiated; undeveloped; before development of 1º germ layers–ectoderm, endoderm, mesoderm Psychiatry Pertaining to the early development of the personality

pri·mor·di·al

(prī-mōr'dē-ăl)
1. Relating to a primordium.
2. Relating to a structure in its first or earliest stage of development.
Synonym(s): primal (2) , primitive.

primitive

of ancient origin but present in modern organisms in an unmodified and unspecialized form.

primitive

first in point of time; existing in a simple or early form; showing little evolution.

primitive groove
longitudinal furrow in the primitive streak of the embryo.
primitive knot
primitive node
enlarged cranial end of the primitive streak.
primitive streak
the thickened median area of the epiblast which sets out the future longitudinal axis of the early embryo.
References in periodicals archive ?
One particularly striking image shows two young girls, staring directly into the camera, wearing the uniform smocks implemented by the Jesuits, an effort to 'Westernize' their primitiveness.
Such a person, he noted, is called in the Passover Haggadah, the "wicked son", who cleans his hands and says, "This doesn't belong to me, this blood and primitiveness.
In explaining these long-forsaken sacraments, Maimonides turns to the world of' the Sabians and their pagan travesties, and develops an historical account that takes humanity from the primitiveness of human sacrifice to the middle ground of animal sacrifice to the final stage of prayer and meditation.
14) Savagery, inferiority, primitiveness, deviance were attributes which found codification in different stereotypic designation of the Others, the major aim being the maintenance of established relations with the world outside or simply to incorporate the anomie from within by projecting it on the Others, often "black sheep" in a perpetually world under siege.
The book presents a new interesting theory on cooking, based on two basic ideas: the first is that cooking and the transition from eating raw to cooked food is the reason for the evolution of man from early primitiveness to the stage of Homo sapiens.
Made from paper, wire and clay, its disarming primitiveness for a moment eclipses the clarity of its tectonic vision.
The American frontier, uncontainable and uncontrollable in its primitiveness, was hence morally superior to the decadent cities and domesticated gardens of the old continent (Nash 2001: 69).
Coupled with the small size of the forces and primitiveness of the technology compared with either World War, all this manoeuvring on land and sea allowed far more dramatic scope to individual initiative and--to use an old-fashioned word--gallantry.
There was one doctor, in particular, after I gave birth to one of my children, who made a few cutting remarks, probably assuming that I was too stupid even to understand them, imputing a primitiveness to me that clearly provoked his distaste.
At the statement of the thoughts were observed primitiveness of judgments, jamming on "trifles", inability to generalize and allocate the main thing.
Such portrayals, she declaimed, serve to legitimize and grant permission to the west to ignore and reinforce unequal power relations even as they seek to "rescue the 'underdeveloped areas' from their misery, to deliver them from their primitiveness to modernity; to the era of 'technical knowledge', 'scientific advances', 'greater production' and 'personal freedom and happiness for all mankind.
Synge's clergyman uncle, who, viewing the Arans' primitiveness negatively, established a Church of Ireland mission there in 1851.