primate


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primate

 [pri´māt]
an individual belonging to the highest order of mammals, Primates, which includes human beings, apes, monkeys, and lemurs.

pri·mate

(prī'māt),
An individual of the order Primates.
[L. primus, first]

primate

(prī′mĭt, -māt′)
n.
(prī′māt′) Any of various mammals of the order Primates, which consists of the lemurs, lorises, tarsiers, New World monkeys, Old World monkeys, and apes including humans, and is characterized by nails on the hands and feet, a short snout, and a large brain.

pri·ma′tial (-mā′shəl) adj.

primate

[prī′māt, prī′mit]
Etymology: L, primus, first
a member of the order of mammals that includes lemurs, monkeys, apes, and humans. Most primates have large brains, stereoscopic vision, and hands and feet developed for grasping.

pri·mate

(prī'māt)
An individual of the order Primates.
[L. primus, first]

primate

any member of the mammalian order Primates, including lemurs, tarsiers, monkeys, apes and humans. These mammals have a placenta, possess nails rather than claws, and usually have a thumb and big toe which are opposable to the other digits, allowing objects to be grasped. All possess a relatively large brain and have well developed eyesight, often with BINOCULAR VISION.

pri·mate

(prī'māt)
An individual of the order Primates.
[L. primus, first]

primate (prī´māt),

n a member of the biologic order of animals of the chordate class Mammalia. The primate order includes lemurs, monkeys, apes, and humans.
primate space,
n the spacing between the primary canine and primary first molar that normally occurs in the anterior primary dentition in children.

primate

an animal belonging to the highest order of mammals, Primates, which includes humans and the nonhuman primates, the apes, monkeys, lemurs, tree-shrews, lorises, aye-ayes, pottos, bush babies and tarsiers. They are characterized by being plantigrade, pentadactyl, by having clavicles, a complete dentition without specialized molars, a voluminous and complicated brain and a supple hand with a thumb that can be approximated to any of the fingers. They have excellent sight and are highly adapted to an arboreal existence, including the possession by some of a prehensile tail.
References in periodicals archive ?
The study says that the clues about ancient primates being tree-dwellers suggests that "primates are primitively arboreal," as opposed to their tree-climbing ways simply evolving separately among different groups of primates.
Marmosets, capuchins and squirrel monkeys are the most common primates kept as pets.
Caption: Peaks and valleys on the chewing surface of a tooth from an ancient South American primate underscore the creature's evolutionary ties to an African primate with similar teeth.
Using a safe and non-invasive technique known as "doubly labeled water," which tracks the body's production of carbon dioxide, the researchers measured the number of calories that primates burned over a 10 day period.
A red-listing workshop on lemurs, held by the IUCN SSC Primate Specialist group in July this year, revealed that 91% of the 103 species and subspecies were threatened with extinction.
Aside from appalling physical suffering, primates experience fear, loneliness, frustration and stress from being kept in captivity.
In a European Commission survey, 80% of the public felt that using primates in laboratories was unacceptable.
Archbishop Robert Machray, who served as bishop of Rupert's Land for almost 40 years, became the first primate of the Church of England in Canada in 1893.
Lemurs are prosimians, or a type of primate (group of mammals that includes humans, apes, monkeys, and lemurs).
The next issue to consider is whether this research would humanize the primate.
Wild primate populations in emerging infectious disease research: the missing link?
But by the time of Christ, humans had probably become the most numerous primate species, when our population passed 250 million, on its way to 1 billion by the early 1800s.