primate


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

primate

 [pri´māt]
an individual belonging to the highest order of mammals, Primates, which includes human beings, apes, monkeys, and lemurs.

pri·mate

(prī'māt),
An individual of the order Primates.
[L. primus, first]

primate

(prī′mĭt, -māt′)
n.
(prī′māt′) Any of various mammals of the order Primates, which consists of the lemurs, lorises, tarsiers, New World monkeys, Old World monkeys, and apes including humans, and is characterized by nails on the hands and feet, a short snout, and a large brain.

pri·ma′tial (-mā′shəl) adj.

pri·mate

(prī'māt)
An individual of the order Primates.
[L. primus, first]

primate

any member of the mammalian order Primates, including lemurs, tarsiers, monkeys, apes and humans. These mammals have a placenta, possess nails rather than claws, and usually have a thumb and big toe which are opposable to the other digits, allowing objects to be grasped. All possess a relatively large brain and have well developed eyesight, often with BINOCULAR VISION.

pri·mate

(prī'māt)
An individual of the order Primates.
[L. primus, first]
References in periodicals archive ?
A number of traits may help shield primates from seasonal ups and downs.
The primate leads, she says, by "sharing and telling the story of our church to itself from coast to coast to coast...
It prohibits foreign grants and restricts domestic awards to perform nonhuman primate research, unless prior approval is provided by the newly created review committee.
An erudite scholar and prolific writer, the primate led members of the church on a visit to the Alake of Egbaland, Oba Adedotun Gbadebo, on Tuesday.
A simulation of agricultural land expansion by the end of the century showed a decline of up to 78 percent in the distribution areas of many primate species.
It was the flexibility in those joints that helped scientists determine that the primates hung out in trees, among other skeletal features that were suited for such a lifestyle.
Marmosets, capuchins and squirrel monkeys are the most common primates kept as pets.
Caption: Peaks and valleys on the chewing surface of a tooth from an ancient South American primate underscore the creature's evolutionary ties to an African primate with similar teeth.
To better understand occupational health and safety practices at facilities housing nonhuman primates, in December 2012, the Association of Primate Veterinarians, with technical support from CDC, surveyed primate veterinarians in North America about animal handling practices and PPE standards at their institutions.
'Many trees that have seeds dispersed by primates are also important to people, because those who live in the vicinity of the forests gather a lot of fruit and nuts,' Olsson said.
SOUTHBORO - Local animal rights advocates and protesters of the facility say they are thrilled with Harvard Medical School's announcement Tuesday that it will wind down operations at the New England Primate Research Center over the next few years and largely shut it down by 2015.
Primates in Peril: The World's 25 Most Endangered Primates, 2012-2014 has been compiled by the Primate Specialist Group of IUCN's Species Survival Commission (SSC) and the International Primatological Society (IPS), in collaboration with Conservation International (CI) and the Bristol Conservation and Science Foundation (BCSF).