primary tumor


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primary tumor

A neoplasm which, in clinical parlance, is regarded as malignant, arising in one site and capable of giving rise to metastatic or secondary tumors. See Metastasis. Cf Tumor of unknown origin.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

primary tumor

In a patient with metastatic cancer, the lesion assumed to be the source of the metastases.
See also: tumor
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
The univariate Cox proportional-hazards model revealed that tumor size [greater than or equal to] 5 cm and a primary tumor in the neck were associated with an increased hazard for progression (hazard ratio [HR] = 4.69,95% CI = 1.34-16.38 and HR = 2.41, 95% CI = 1.00-5.82, resp.) and death (HR = 1.17, 95% CI = 0.38-3.58 and HR = 1.75, 95% CI = 0.64-4.85, resp.).
In a cohort of new NPC patients, we found that perfusion and permeability based on DCE-MRI are higher in regional nodes of higher N stage tumors, and that the parameters in the nodes have no relationship with the corresponding parameters in its primary tumor. These findings showed that DCEMRI in the metastatic lymph plays a distinct role in characterizing the nodal status in NPC.
After induction chemotherapy, the T2-weighted axial image (b) and contrast enhanced coronal images (d, f) showed that the primary tumor and all lesions in bilateral kidneys had decreased in size.
In two patients with large axillary lymph node involvement and in one patient with painful sternal bone metastases, the breast primary tumor and the metastases were treated in the same cryoablation session.
The average primary tumor size was 2.8 cm (range, 0.8-5.5 cm) and most were locally advanced: pT3 (12 of 16, 75%) or pT4b (1 of 16, 6%).
A total of 156 patients for stage IV colon cancer with inoperable synchronous liver-only metastases included in this retrospective analysis were not randomized and were divided into two groups: (1) Patients with surgical resection of the primary tumor with metastasectomy first and (2) patients with chemotherapy first.
In conclusion, patients with head or neck squamous cell carcinomas shown that the esophagus, gastric carcinoma is the site with the highest risk of developing a synchronous second primary tumor in patients with head or neck carcinoma, particularly those with laryngeal carcinoma.
Out of the 120 patients studied for [ERCC1.sup.+]CTC, corresponding primary tumor tissue (FFPE) was available in 77 cases and subjected to comparative immunohistochemical ERCC1 detection.
Although some patients with thick primary tumors (thicker than 3.5 millimeters) benefit from having their lymph nodes removed, the trial data suggest that the timing of the intervention is not as crucial for them as it is for patients with intermediate thickness primary tumors.
Indeed, cytological examination of fine needle aspiration biopsy performed on thyroid nodules demonstrates a primary tumor in up to 5% of cases [2], and a secondary localization in approximately 0.07% [13].
At the 23rd day following the interventions, 5 mice from each group were euthanized immediately to measure the primary tumor sizes.