primary progressive aphasia


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primary progressive aphasia

A subtype of frontotemporal lobar degeneration characterised by reduced speech production, speech errors, and word retrieval difficulties resulting in mutism and an inability to communicate; memory is relatively preserved, at least in the early stages of disease.

pri·mar·y pro·gres·sive a·pha·si·a

(PPA) (prī'mar-ē prŏ-gres'iv ă-fāz'ē-ă)
A degenerative disorder of which the early major symptom is an aphasia that increases in severity and (usually) eventually includes dementia.

primary progressive aphasia

An atypical form of DEMENTIA featuring progressive loss of the language function without severe memory loss, loss of visual and spacial skills or deterioration in behaviour. The defect is essentially one of word comprehension so that there is inexorable loss of the ability to find an appropriate word or name objects (anomia) or to employ normal syntax. The condition is associated with focal degeneration in the speech areas on the left temporal lobe of the brain, but it is not considered to be a subset of Alzheimer's disease.
References in periodicals archive ?
TDP-43 pathology in primary progressive aphasia and frontotemporal dementia with pathologic Alzheimer disease.
Correlative studies of structural and functional imaging in primary progressive aphasia. Am J Alzheimers Dis Other Demen 2008; 23:184-191.
Weintraub et al., "Classification of primary progressive aphasia and its variants," Neurology, vol.
Beagle et al., "Distinct spatiotemporal patterns of neuronal functional connectivity in primary progressive aphasia variants," Brain, vol.
Primary progressive aphasia. Ann Neurol 2001;49:425-32.
Cognition and anatomy in three variants of primary progressive aphasia. Ann Neurol 2004;55:335-46.
Primary progressive aphasia: a language-based dementia.
Ichimi et al (4) examined 1723 consecutive patients attending a tertiary memory clinic in Japan, and found that those with semantic dementia did not differ from those with semantic variant of primary progressive aphasia in terms of clinical characteristics and language function.
(2000) Proactive Management of Primary Progressive Aphasia. In: Beukelman, D., Yorkston, K.
28, issues 8-9 (August-September 2014), the 16 chapters in this volume survey aspects of primary progressive aphasia, including its diagnosis, disease progression, treatments, differential diagnosis, biomarkers, genetics, imaging, assessment, and long-term follow-up.
residents have behavior variant FTD or another FTD-related condition, primary progressive aphasia, according to AFTD.
The language dominant dementias are a subcategory of the frontotemporal lobar dementias specifically called Primary Progressive Aphasias as well as an Alzheimer's disease variant Logopenic Dementia.

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