primary dose


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primary dose

An initial, large dose given to provide a high blood level as soon as possible.
See also: dose
References in periodicals archive ?
Recommendations for use of yellow fever vaccine booster doses * * A single primary dose of yellow fever vaccine provides long-lasting protection and is adequate for most travelers [Category A].
According to [[tau].sub.c] values and the amount of broad and narrow component, it is evident that primary dose, secondary dose, deformation, and thermal aging affect the motional behavior of spin probe.
At both 3 and 5 years after the first dose, the booster dose elicited substantially higher geometric mean antibody titers (GMT), compared with the titers elicited by a primary dose. Using a complement serum bactericidal activity (SBA) assay and baby rabbit complement (brSBA) as a measure of immune response, a booster dose administered 5 years after the first dose elicited a GMT for serogroup C of 23,613, compared with 9,045 among subjects administered a primary dose (ACIP meeting, October 2010).
Nevertheless, independent research indicates that serotypes included in the vaccine continue to circulate with some of them on the rise in people over 65, for example 19A and 19F.4,7-10 Modelling undertaken by Pfizer and published in the peer reviewed medical journal Epidemiology & Infection in July 2018, suggests that removing one of the primary doses would result in more cases of invasive and non-invasive disease that will affect not just the infant population but also older ages, especially the elderly.
Primary doses can be administered before transplantation and rapel doses can be administered after transplantation.
All the potential benefits that the vaccination can offer to the public health does not only depend on the maintenance of the vaccines or the introduction of new ones in the vaccination schedule, but also on achieving high coverage for all primary doses and boosters.
Participants who received all 3 primary doses as DTaP-Hib had antibody concentrations 2-4 years later that were approximately half those of participants who received all 3 primary doses as DTwP-Hib.
The children had received their primary doses of the measles, mumps, and rubella vaccine (Merck-brand MMRII vaccine) and the varicella vaccine (Varivax) at age 12 months or older at least 1 month before their enrollment in the study.
Since its introduction as a 2+1 dosing schedule in 2006, overall levels of invasive pneumococcal disease, which causes diseases such as meningitis, sepsis and pneumonia, have fallen significantly in the UK, especially in children.1 However, following advice from the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation based on modelling1 and a small immunogenicity study in 213 infants, 2 the UK Government has decided to drop one of the primary doses and implement a 1+1 dosing schedule.