primary care physician


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primary care physician

A mainstream physician who provides care to a patient at the time of first (non-emergency) contact, which usually occurs on an outpatient basis. In the US, primary care providers include internists (formerly, general practitioners), family practitioners and paediatricians; in many regions of the US, gynaecologists provide primary care to women.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

primary care physician

A physician who provides care to a Pt at the time of first–non-emergent contact, which usually occurs on an outPt basis; PCPs include internists (formerly general practitioners), family practitioners, or emergency room physicians. See Family practice, General practitioner, Internist.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

pri·mar·y care phy·si·cian

(prī'mar-ē kār fi-zish'ăn)
A physician in family practice, internal medicine, obstetrics/gynecology, or pediatrics who is a patient's first contact for health care in an ambulatory setting.
See also: health care provider
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Furthermore, primary care physicians appear to be significantly undervalued by employing hospitals.
I wonder whether the primary care physician here is responding to information that is beyond even "clinical information of a nonphysical nature." He believes his relationship with this patient requires change, and has good ideas about how to do that: not provide antibiotics or insist on a family meeting, for example.
He has spoken and written nationally to primary care physicians on the strategies and practicalities of forming or joining ACOs.
The Longitudinal Preceptorship program pairs a medical student with a primary care physician in a small town for the first two years of medical school; they meet once a month to see how primary care physicians develop relationships with their patients.
The effectiveness of low doses of antidepressants in such cases, long advocated by primary care physicians, remains unclear, Katon adds.
Major Finding: Patients comanaged by a primary care physician and a pulmonologist were 4.6 times more likely to receive an appropriate level of care, as compared to patients treated by a primary care physician alone.
PLAINTIFF'S CLAIM The doctor who treated the foot infection at the hospital was negligent in failing to follow up and properly transfer care of the patient to the primary care physician. The primary care physician and his associate were negligent in failing to treat the C difficile infection properly.
* Forty-two percent of patients diagnosed with clinical depression and 47% diagnosed with generalized anxiety disorder were first diagnosed by a primary care physician.
* Waiting nine months to schedule a physical with a primary care physician, even though a patient may have barely utilized any services that year
(1.) Ashton MR et al., Primary care physician attitudes regarding sexually transmitted diseases, Sexually Transmitted Diseases, 2002, 29(4):246-251.

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