prickle

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Related to prickliness: thornier

prickle

(prĭk′əl)
n.
1.
a. A small hard pointed outgrowth of the epidermis of a plant, in contrast to a modified plant organ such as a spine or thorn.
b. A spine, thorn, or other small sharp structure.
2. A tingling or pricking sensation: felt prickles in my leg after sitting for so long.
v. prick·led, prick·ling, prick·les
v.intr.
1. To feel a tingling or pricking sensation: His skin prickled with fear.
2. To rise or stand up like prickles: The hair on my neck prickled.
v.tr.
To cause a tingling or pricking sensation in: Tears prickled my eyes.

prickle

a hard, pointed plant structure containing no VASCULAR BUNDLE structure.
References in periodicals archive ?
Mamet springs from a similar mid-western-macho tradition, though he has since added his own unique carapace of contrarian prickliness, and even announced himself to be something of a conservative, or more precisely a non-liberal.
His thoughts on poets and poetry in this early period, showcased by the satirical parody in the Epistola a Barrionuevo (Rimas 1604), highlight a defensive prickliness. Yet Lope is not alone in this self-defense.
Putin, dressed in a red tie and a sharply tailored suit, displayed an ex-KGB man's prickliness at questions from business leaders.
His taste for battle and prickliness about honor render him, to some extent, inappreciative of the benefits of peaceable capitalism.
Eli, a 15-year old girl, who finds all body functions, except her own, appalling, hates her mother without mercy or cause and is so repellent in her self-absorption, prickliness and sarcasm that it's hard to identify with her.
Scottish pride and Scottish prickliness at being "scotched" rendered very sweet what the Enlightenment figures felt, by the late eighteenth century, was an achieved intellectual place above contemporary Englishmen and on a par with European circles of learning.
Common knowledge among the students that his parents were not married when he was born compounded Castro's prickliness. His dislike of things yanqui was also evident during these early years.
Since it is impossible to do justice to the whole richness of the ingenuity and prickliness of Moore's and Stein's aesthetics, this discussions has been narrowed down to the role of dialogue, the notions of intensity, insistence, and the split of the subject.
They know the weak spots in his defences, or at least be believes that they do, and this belief engenders a prickliness verging on paranoia; thus be perceives his daughter's suggestion that the statuette might be of Cretan origin as a goad, flaunting the children's intrusion on, indeed command of, his territory: "Sculpture cretoise, meme dit pour le narguer, pour montrer combien il est facile [...] de le battre sur son propre terrain ..." (800).
Murray's prickliness makes him infinitely more fascinating than Tim Henman, but can he really be the next John McEnroe in terms of talent and temperament?
Around this time I also became aware of the content of the Physio-Kundalini Scale, and, coincidentally, Item 5 also mentioned itchiness: "Does your skin or the inside of your body sometimes tingle, vibrate, itch, or tickle, for no apparent reason?" I speculated that this prickliness might be an indicator of Kundalini not previously experienced by me (and not explicitly included in my published definition: Thalbourne, 2003, pp.
In one of his intelligently high-handed ways with obvious boundaries, he discusses panegyric as sharing with satire in the rhetoric of praise and blame and sharing with it too, in Jonson, Corbett, and Carew, a new prickliness about its own function and a growing polemical involvement in current political divisions.