prickle

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prickle

(prĭk′əl)
n.
1.
a. A small hard pointed outgrowth of the epidermis of a plant, in contrast to a modified plant organ such as a spine or thorn.
b. A spine, thorn, or other small sharp structure.
2. A tingling or pricking sensation: felt prickles in my leg after sitting for so long.
v. prick·led, prick·ling, prick·les
v.intr.
1. To feel a tingling or pricking sensation: His skin prickled with fear.
2. To rise or stand up like prickles: The hair on my neck prickled.
v.tr.
To cause a tingling or pricking sensation in: Tears prickled my eyes.

prickle

a hard, pointed plant structure containing no VASCULAR BUNDLE structure.
References in periodicals archive ?
The nurse patiently pulled every one of those prickles out.
Told from the perspective of the main protagonist's mother, "Prickles," is a story about a supernatural being.
Woollacott wanted ten winners in his first ten months training under rules, but six months has resulted in a dozen, with Prickles scoring for the first time over hurdles.
Those are the prickles of old age, but they are not everything that defines aging.
Its rich dark leaves have few prickles and it produces bright red berries even without a male plant near.
The native species grow as herbaceous deciduous shrubs and can generally be readily classified on the basis of plant characteristics that include the prickles, leaf, flower form and colour, period of bloom, the fruiting hips and stem hardiness.
The elderly men from down the street become Rachel's friends when they stop in to check on Grace and Grace's cat, Prickles. During the course of the novel, Rachel starts college at the "uni," and meets a Taiwanese cello player, Harold.
Poison, prickles, aggression, invisibility and the ability to make itself into a ball make the hedgehog the most well-defended creature in our countryside.
It looks like a hedgehog and rolls into an impenetrable ball of prickles when threatened.
small prickles present proximally, smooth distally.
But some animals, such as crabs, sea otters, and some fish, use a trick to get past the prickles. They flip the urchin over and attack its short-spined bottom.