pressure overload


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pressure overload

Demand placed on muscle, esp. heart muscle, in response to high blood pressure or stenotic valves. Over time pressure overload results in cardiac hypertrophy and, eventually, heart failure.
See also: overload
References in periodicals archive ?
This may also leads to chronic heart failure due to volume or pressure overload of ventricles which further causes left ventricle hypertrophy.
Willemsen et al., "Cardiac hypertrophy is enhanced in PPARa-/- mice in response to chronic pressure overload," Cardiovascular Research, vol.
Armstrong, "An echocardiographic index for separation of right ventricular volume and pressure overload," Journal of the American College of Cardiology, vol.
Nagayama et al., "Monoamine oxidase A-mediated enhanced catabolism of norepinephrine contributes to adverse remodeling and pump failure in hearts with pressure overload," Circulation Research, vol.
Huang et al., "[alpha]b-crystallin suppresses pressure overload cardiac hypertrophy," Circulation Research, vol.
With abdominal aortic constriction, the heart is challenged with an immediate pressure overload and myocardial hypertrophy develops within days.
Further, mice lacking PDGFR-beta in heart muscle cells developed more severe heart failure when exposed to pressure overload than did normal mice.
Deleterious effects of sugar and protective effects of starch on cardiac remodeling, contractile dysfunction, and mortality in response to pressure overload. Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol.
RV pressure overload can result from any condition that impedes the passage of blood flow between the RV and the LV.
Physiological heart hypertrophy is a process of adaptation to an increased hemodynamic and/or pressure overload. The primary stimulus for cardiac hypertrophy is mechanical stress, which induces a growth response in the overloaded myocardium.
The ventricles lose the ability to contract and empty effectively, leading to volume and pressure overload in these heart chambers.
Activities that are for the most part static have been shown to increase blood pressure to as high as 350-400/300-400 mm Hg, resulting in cardiovascular pressure overload with decreased venous return.