presbycusis


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presbycusis

 [pres″be-ku´sis]
progressive, bilaterally symmetrical perceptive hearing loss occurring with age; it usually occurs after age 50 and is caused by structural changes in the organs of hearing. Initially, changes in the inner ear, such as degeneration of hair cells and changes in the basilar membrane, lead to decreased hearing at higher tones and a decline in pitch discrimination. As hearing continues to be lost, even lower pitch tones become harder to hear.

pres·by·a·cu·sis

, presbyacusia (prez'bē-ă-kū'sis, -kū'sē-ă),
Loss of hearing associated with aging; manifest as reduced ability to perceive or discriminate sounds; the pattern and age of onset vary. See: phonemic regression.
[presby- + G. akousis, hearing]

presbycusis

/pres·by·cu·sis/ (-ku´sis) progressive, bilaterally symmetrical sensorineural hearing loss occurring with age.

presbycusis

[-ko̅o̅′sis]
Etymology: Gk, presbys + akousis, hearing
hearing loss associated with aging. It usually involves both a loss of hearing sensitivity and a reduction in the clarity of speech.

presbycusis

Age-related hearing loss Audiology A progressive loss of hearing 2º to age-related changes in the inner or middle ear, beginning with high-frequency sounds–eg, speech, which may have a genetic predisposition, as it tends to occur in families; it occurs ±25% > age 65 to 75 yrs old, 50%  > age 75. See Hearing loss.

pres·by·cu·sis

(prez'bē-kyū'sis)
A usually gradual, frequently bilateral sensorineural or conductive hearing loss often related to the middle ear that gradually occurs in most people as they age; usually more pronounced for high-pitched sounds; the pattern and age of onset may vary.
Synonym(s): presbyacusis, presbyacusia.
[G. presbys, old man, + akousis, hearing]

pres·by·cu·sis

(prez'bē-kyū'sis)
A usually gradual, frequently bilateral sensorineural or conductive hearing loss often related to the middle ear that gradually occurs in most people as they age; usually more pronounced for high-pitched sounds.
[G. presbys, old man, + akousis, hearing]

presbycusis (prez´bikū´sis),

n the gradual loss of hearing that occurs naturally with age. The first sign is the diminished capacity to discern high-pitched tones.

presbycusis, presbyacusia

progressive, bilateral loss of hearing with advancing age; occurs in several animal species, especially old dogs.
References in periodicals archive ?
Executive dysfunction and presbycusis in older persons with and without memory loss and dementia.
Presbycusis is the third most prevalent pathology in this age group, behind only arthritis and arterial hypertension (7).
Patients were excluded when they did not complete one of such procedures, as well as those that showed hearing loss with conductive components, setting aside the sensorineural presbycusis diagnosis in the average threshold pure tone results.
Histopathologic evaluation of vascular findings in the cochlea in patients with presbycusis.
This can be seen with presbycusis, internal auditory canal (IAC) and cerebellopontine angle (CPA) tumors, labyrinthitis and CNS pathology.
The ENT department at MAMC observed symptoms of presbycusis in people at the age of 60, which should ideally begin at 75.
Individuals can experience hearing loss as they age, a condition known as presbycusis that may affect one-third of Americans over the age of 60.
Presbycusis phenotypes form a heterogeneous continuum when ordered by degree and configuration of hearing loss.
In a nine-year study that was a collaboration between University of South Florida's Global Center for Hearing and Speech Research and the National Technical Institute for the Deaf at the Rochester Institute of Technology, researchers were able to identify the first genetic biomarker for presbycusis.
A predominant cause of hearing loss is presbycusis, a condition thought to result from degeneration of hair cells and other structures in the inner ear that through signaling to the auditory nerve, result in the auditory perceptions underlying hearing.
In sensory Presbycusis there is loss of sensory elements in the basal end (high-frequency end) of cochlea with preservation of neurons resulting in high frequency sensorineural hearing loss.
Age-related hearing loss, or presbycusis, is common among older adults--almost two- thirds of Americans over the age of 70 have some degree of hearing loss, according to an article published in the February 28, 2011 issue of the Journal of Gerontology.