prerenal azotemia


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Related to prerenal azotemia: postrenal azotemia

non·re·nal az·o·te·mi·a

, prerenal azotemia
nitrogen retention resulting from something other than primary renal disease.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

prerenal azotemia

Renal underperfusion Nephrology The most common form of acute renal failure, characterized by ↑ nitrogenous waste, due to ↓ blood flow to the kidney Lab ↑ nitrogenous wastes–eg, creatinine and urea, which act as poisons when they accumulate in the body, damaging tissues and compromising organ function Risk factors ↓ blood volume–eg, dehydration, prolonged vomiting, diarrhea, bleeding, burns, etc; pump failure–eg, CHF, shock, kidney trauma or surgery, renal artery embolism, and other types of renal artery occlusion. See Renal failure.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Hypercreatininemia and prerenal azotemia are predictors of death in patients with unstable angina and LBBB within 14 days of the onset of the disease.
Prerenal azotemia: Renal blood flow decreases because of intense, compensatory renal afferent arteriolar constriction.
It is also possible that vomiting caused a prerenal azotemia, leading to the development of the sufficient renal dysfunction to precipitate the metformin-induced lactic acidosis.
Traditional NSAIDs possess dose-limiting toxicities, mainly, the risk for gastrointestinal ulceration and increased bleeding times, with other toxicities, such as prerenal azotemia, occurring at all dose ranges (Bjorkman, 1998; Cryer & Kimmey, 1998; Tolman).
Determining the fractional excretion of sodium (FENa) is valuable in differentiating between acute tubular injury and prerenal azotemia (the presence of increased amounts of nitrogenous substances in the blood, consistent with renal failure) (Corwin, Schreiber, & Fang, 1984).
Moreover, acute hyperglycemia may lead to volume depletion and then increase the risk for prerenal azotemia due to osmotic diuresis.
Differential diagnosis of prerenal azotemia from acute tubular necrosis and prediction of recovery by Doppler ultrasound.
With acute obstruction the urinary chemistry values are similar to those in prerenal azotemia. These findings include urinary sodium less than 20 mEq/L, [FE.sub.Na] less than 1%, and urine osmolality greater than 500 mOsm/kg [H.sub.2]O (Yarger, 1991).