prerenal


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prerenal

 [pre-re´nal]
1. located in front of a kidney.
2. pertaining to a process that occurs before the kidney is reached, such as acute renal failure in which the kidney does not receive adequate blood flow. See also postrenal.

pre·re·nal

(prē-rē'năl),
Anterior to a kidney.
[L. ren, kidney]
References in periodicals archive ?
It was seen that the patients who had symptoms such as pseudocyst presence (p=1, p=1), fluid collection two or more areas (p=1, p=1) and increase in prerenal fascia thickness (p=1, p=1) had no significant statistical value in terms of polymorphism compared to those without these symptoms (Table 4).
We would have liked to report etiology and classification of AKI as prerenal, renal (acute tubular necrosis), and postrenal if the study was done prospectively.
In this context, it is expected that an increase in renal perfusion can rapidly reverse the decline in GFR or the prerenal state.
In our patient, the AKI was believed to be prerenal, considering the calculated FeNa was below 1% and the adequate response to intravenous fluids.
They recommended increasing total fluid intake due to possible prerenal factors contributing to the acute kidney injury in light of insensible water losses due to JEB.
His complete blood count, electrolytes, vitamin B12, thyroid function, and liver function tests were within normal limits, except for a CK of 1090 IU/L, mildly elevated 10,680 white blood cells per mcL, low iron level of 26 ug/dL, and creatinine value of 1.26 mg/dL thought to be prerenal in nature secondary to dehydration.
Despite this theoretical renal safety, the patients in each case developed AKI in the absence of any clear prerenal etiologies such as hypotension or volume depletion.
Alternatively, dehydration resulting in prerenal azotemia and accumulation of uric acid may have altered systemic pH; this is supported by the presence of urate crystals in the kidney (i.e., nephric gout) which is often a result of dehydration in avian species.
Septicaemia was the second most common cause of ARF followed by acute glomerulonephritis and prerenal causes contributed less in our study.
Fluid imbalance can lead to hypotension, heart failure, dehydration or fluid uptake, prerenal insufficiency, and sudden death.
Hypoglycemia in present study might have been due to anorexia and subsequent starvation where as higher level of blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and creatinine which might have been due to renal insufficiency that resulting from dehydration and reduction of renal blood flow with subsequent prerenal azotaemia (Samad et al., 1994).
This finding indicates the existence of a renal or prerenal disorder resulting in low ability for urinary concentration.