prepotent


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prepotent

(prē-pōt′nt)
adj.
1. Greater in power, influence, or force than another or others; predominant.
2. Genetics Of, having, or exhibiting prepotency.

pre·po′tent·ly adv.

prepotent

(prē-pō′tĕnt) [″ + potentia, power]
Pert. to the greater power of one parent to transmit inherited characteristics to the offspring.

prepotent

having great power; of the two parents, the one with greater power to transmit heritable characteristics to the offspring.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the prepotent identity condition, the experimental procedure was the same as above, except that the list of action identification was replaced by a bogus questionnaire.
For example, socially competent behavior often requires not choosing prepotent responses (e.
2) As there is an assumed hierarchy in the needs and lower needs being more prepotent than the higher needs, basic needs would have greater effect on the SWB of the elderly.
In Malsow's theorization the appearance of a need usually rests on the prior satisfaction of another more prepotent need which is the strongest, in the sense that it has to be satisfied first.
The results indicated that the ability to inhibit prepotent responses to a situation is indeed related to the production of symbolic play, with greater inhibitory control being associated with more symbolic play, explaining 16 per cent to 30 per cent of the variance.
42) Behaviourally relevant letters were letters that people had to distinguish from other letters associated with prepotent responses (habitual learned responses), thus differentiating their response (for example, when people are instructed to move their right hand when viewing any letter but b, that should elicit a response with the left hand; the latter is the behaviourally relevant one).
It has been variously described as including planning, initiating, monitoring, and flexibly correcting actions according to feedback; sustaining and shifting attention; controlling impulses and inhibiting prepotent but maladaptive responses; selecting goals and performing actions that may not lead to an immediate reward, with a view to reaching a longer term objective; holding information in mind whilst performing a task (working memory); and creatively reacting to novel situations with non-habitual responses (Hughes & Graham, 2002; Shallice & Burgess, 1991; Welsh & Pennington, 1988).
The tendency in the social sciences is to see factors in a kind of nested relationship with one another: some factors are more important than others, or some factors are acted upon by others in a kind of prepotent relationship.
If they do not out-vote them, the people of Germanic, of Slavonic, of Pelasgic, of Mongolian stock outnumber the prepotent Celts; and March seldom found his speculation centered upon one of these.
Once we introduce some uncoupling of what the spotter passes on of what the spotlight illuminates (this seems to require an intact superior frontal gyrus to inhibit prepotent responses (du et al.
On the need to "repress the boldness and the power of all prepotent individuals whosoever," see the extract from the provision of the Florentine government in December 1429, quoted in Brucker, 489-90.
Merinos are one of the oldest of sheep breeds, and centuries of selective breeding have resulted in a prepotent sheep that has been frequently crossbred with other breeds to improve their wool characteristics.