prepotency


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prepotency

(prē-pōt′n-sē)
n.
1. The condition of being greater in power, influence, or force than another or others; predominance.
2. Genetics The ability of one parent, variety, or strain to transmit individual traits to an offspring, apparently to the exclusion of the other parent, variety, or strain.
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Prepotency of inbred sires on commercial varieties of maize.
Further, these effects were apparently unrelated to preexisting differences in responsivity to the types of CSs (fear-relevant and fear-irrelevant), or phenomena such as salience or stimulus prepotency (see also Forsyth et al., 1996).
Maslow proposed five classes of need, which represent the order of importance (hierarchy of prepotency) to the individual.
That study also suggested discrimination against self pollen in competition with outcross pollen; however, discrimination against illegitimate outcross pollen was not detected, leading to speculation that inbreeding effects might account for the observed prepotency of outcross over self pollen (see Barrett 1988; Casper et al.
The findings of this study suggest that efforts to establish the prepotency of institutional versus ecological explanations of organizational survival should not preclude inquiry into the causal consistencies and interactions between these theories' predictions.
The three families who refused donation valued the relation with the health personnel negatively because of its coldness, hardness and prepotency. Moreover, either by action (not emphasizing the severity of the situation) or omission (no comments were made so they assumed that their relative would overcome the crisis), they had raised their hopes, only to be disappointed later, and this led them to suspect that the healthcare personnel had not done all they could.
Ferster noted that an absence of positively reinforced behavior may be due to the strength and prepotency of escape and avoidance behaviors and it may be difficult to ascertain the controlling variables in a given case.
[21] I will contend that d'Urfe showcases the written word's prepotency only to allow the writing process to destabilize textual authority; he then proposes a new paradigm for writing based on a model which overtly appropriates the vicissitudes of speech.
(iii) Pollen from the two genotypes was equal in prepotency. Percent outcrosses (individual-plant basis) would then equal ([number white midrib plants x 2]/total number of plants) since one-half of actual outcrosses would be green midrib and not distinguishable from selfs.
For the moment, the discriminability functions of the present study may be viewed as an inverse instance of an effect predicted by Skinner (1953), who asserted that one type of "'not knowing what one is doing' is explained by the principle of prepotency. In the heat of battle there may be no time to observe one's behavior, since strong responses conflict with the discriminative response" (p.
It is a fact that many great sires, Sadler's Wells and Danehill included, have been pure-breeding bays, but so have a lot of rank-bad sires, so that little area of prepotency signifies nothing of any consequence.
But prepotency for coat colour should not be taken as an indication that a horse is prepotent for any characteristics more meaningful in the athletic ability department.