preplacental

pre·pla·cen·tal

(prē'plă-sen'tăl),
Before formation of a placenta.

preplacental

(prē″plă-sĕn′tăl) [″ + placenta, a flat cake]
Occurring prior to formation of the placenta.
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References in periodicals archive ?
It leads to a significant reduction in anaemia incidence during pregnancy and plays a vital role in reducing maternal and foetal morbidity and mortality.15 Anaemic mother's placenta total volume is similar to placenta for high altitudes pregnancies that are considered as a preplacental hypoxic condition.15 Hypoxia as a consequence of maternal sideropaenic anaemia causes significant increase of terminal villi blood vessels in 1cm of placental tissues and their total volume.1 The placenta and foetus grow independently and perceived changes seem to be a compensatory mechanism that develops in order to fulfil foetal needs in the disturbed environment.4
Changes in fetal capillaries during preplacental hypoxia: growth, shape remodelingand villous capillarization in placenta from high altitude pregnancies.
On the other hand, in the preuterine (preplacental) pattern of placental injury, the homogeneously mature placenta typically shows diffuse hypervascularity of chorionic villi, which, however, does not have to meet the numerical criteria of chorangiosis.
Among rare data considering terminal villis' surface density in preplacental hypoxic environment we contrive that Huang et al.
Indeed Kingdom and Kaufmann [30] report that preplacental or uteroplacental hypoxia with adaptive placental growth is a primary cause for growth restriction at term.
Hence any factor that influences angiogenesis, especially hypoxia, whether preplacental or postplacental, can directly influence the number of capillaries occupying a single terminal villus.
Changes in fetal capillaries during preplacental hypoxia: growth, shape remodelling and villous capillarization in placentae from high-altitude pregnancies.
We use the terms preuterine, uterine, and postuterine hypoxia, which are probably more adequate than preplacental, uteroplacental, and postplacental hypoxia because the former terms reflect more accurately the pathomechanisms of these types of placental injury than the latter terms do, in line with the original intention of those that introduced those latter terms.