preoccupation


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preoccupation

[prē·ok′yəpā′shən]
a state of being self-absorbed or engrossed in one's own thoughts to a degree that hinders effective contact with or relationship to external reality.
References in periodicals archive ?
Toutefois, le caractere aigu de la preoccupation ethique que manifestent a ce sujet les enseignants consultes, particulierement a l'occasion du jugement final a poser sur la reussite ou l'echec dans les cas limites de performances d'etudiants, constitue un aspect qu'il faudra investiguer plus avant lors de l'administration de l'enquete.
L'approche adoptee pour le present article consiste a examiner dans quelle mesure les femmes prennent la parole pour attirer l'attention sur les preoccupations feminines.
Gay men are less likely to seek help because a preoccupation with physical appearance is considered a social norm by many.
Life is a stage; we play our part and receive our reward," wrote Vondel, the great poet of the Netherlands, expressing the moral preoccupation of 17th-century Dutch culture (1).
Let's quit picking on commercial television's preoccupation with sex and violence.
Height describes Malcolm X as a "gentle and kind man" whose vision was overshadowed by a preoccupation with his perceived "focus on the white man.
Army deserters were perhaps the single biggest preoccupation, as revealed by hundreds of pages that document the party's payoffs to guards who caught deserters.
A number of common behaviors can be noted by counselors and other practitioners as possible cues: lack of concern about personal welfare; changes in social patterns; a decline in school achievement; altered patterns of sleeping and eating; attempts to put personal affairs in order or to make amends; use or abuse of alcohol or drugs; unusual interest in how others are feeling; preoccupation with death and violence themes; sudden improvement after a period of depression; and sudden or increased promiscuity.
35% of "normal" dieters develop severe food and weight preoccupation, often resulting in anorexia or bulimia;
Those who relapsed later had scored higher, at the conclusion of treatment, on scales that measured the time spent on, distress with, and lack of control over eating preoccupation and rituals.
Ellis traces the history of the nation's "mania for information, for rumor and gossip," as well as its seemingly contradictory preoccupation with privacy.