premorbid

premorbid

 [pre-mor´bid]
occurring before the development of disease.

pre·mor·bid

(prē-mōr'bid),
Preceding the occurrence of disease.
[pre- + L. morbidus, ill, fr. morbus, disease]

premorbid

/pre·mor·bid/ (-mor´bid) occurring before development of disease.

pre·mor·bid

(prē-mōr'bid)
Preceding the occurrence of disease.
[pre- + L. morbidus, ill, fr. morbus, disease]

pre·mor·bid

(prē-mōr'bid)
Preceding occurrence of disease.
[pre- + L. morbidus, ill, fr. morbus, disease]

premorbid

occurring before the development of disease.
References in periodicals archive ?
There are myriad clinical variations that comprise this heterogeneous brain syndrome, including level of premorbid functioning; acute vs gradual onset of psychosis; the type and severity of hallucinations or delusions; the dimensional spectrum of negative symptoms and cognitive impairments; the presence and intensity of suicidal or homicidal urges; and the type of medical and psychiatric comorbidities.
One aspect of neuropsychological assessment, the assessment of premorbid functioning (PF), is of particular importance.
The Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised (WAIS-R) Information subtest was used as an approximation of premorbid cognition (19,20).
Premorbid personality of the patient was also not contributory.
These results should be viewed in light of their retrospective and self-reported nature--neither of which : take into account either premorbid cannabis use or age of illness onset as either predictors or moderators--but the data suggest a dose-response relationship between cannabis use and psychosis, according to the investigators.
The following section initially describes premorbid and disease-related psychosocial barriers commonly reported by the participants.
The Two stage model posits that schizophrenics with better premorbid adjustment are more sociable and, therefore, more exposed to opportunities of substance abuse.
The clinical features predictive of an EEG abnormality, but not a change in diagnosis or management, included aggression, hallucinations and a premorbid insult.
Postoperatively he made an uneventful recovery and was back to his premorbid mobility at the 6-month review.