premium

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pre·mi·um

(prē'mē-ŭm)
The amount that must be paid to the insurer to maintain the desired health insurance coverage.

premium

(prē′mē-um)
A payment made periodically to a health care insurer in exchange for benefits coverage (indemnity against future expenses).

pre·mi·um

(prē'mē-ŭm)
The amount that must be paid to the insurer to maintain the desired health insurance coverage.

premium,

n the amount charged by a dental benefits organization for coverage of a level of benefits for a specified time.
premium, earned,
n the portion of a policy's premium payment for which the protection of the policy has already been given.
premium rate,
n the price per unit of insurance.
premium tax,
n an assessment levied by a state government, usually on the net premium income collected in that state by insurance companies.
premium, unearned,
n the part of the premium applicable to the unexpired part of the policy period.
References in periodicals archive ?
4371 imposes a FET on certain premiums paid to a foreign insurer not engaged in a U.
Premium financing is the practice of lending cash to a personal or commercial venture to pay its vital property/casualty insurance premiums in one lump sum, and spread the payments over the fiscal year.
During that hearing, the Senate HELP Committee voted for an increase in flat-rate premiums from $19 to $46.
Anticipating this, the minister of finance has been clear in his comments that the OHP is vastly different from the old Ontario Health Insurance Plan premiums that were discontinued in 1989.
One "expert opinion" holds that you should offer renewal premiums only at the beginning of the series, to encourage your most loyal readers to get their money to you ASAP.
The arrangement is in connection with the performance of services, the employer or service recipient pays all or part of the premiums and the employee or service provider has the right to name the beneficiary or has an interest in the policy cash value.
No doubt there has been significant movement into captives over the past 15 to 20 years, with market-share projections indicating that the captive premium volume exceeded 50% of total risk-bearing premiums in the United States.
Financial service firms are among those marketers using premiums to attract and retain customers.
Both claimant fraud and provider fraud helped inflate the cost of workers comp insurance premiums in the late 1980s and early 1990s, says insurance fraud expert Dennis Jay.
Its premiums in the states surveyed increased by an average of 23 percent, or nine times faster than Social Security benefits rose.
Now, along come the super premiums to turn all that around.
Today, we are here to address an evolving competitive imbalance and other implications of two insurance funds with sharply different premiums.