prelingual hearing loss

Hearing loss that precedes the onset of speech or learning spoken language; it is severe, stable, and less common than post-lingual hearing loss.
Aetiology Prelingual hearing loss is largely inherited: 50% are monogenic, 75% are autosomal recessive; 20%, autosomal dominant; 5%, X-linked recessive; the rest are caused by perinatal factors, infections in infancy or trauma
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prelingual hearing loss

Prelingual deafness Audiology Hearing loss that precedes the onset of speech or learning spoken language; it is severe, stable, and less common than postlingual hearing loss; 50% of PHL is monogenic, 75% of PHL is AR; 20%, AD; 5%, X-R; the rest are caused by perinatal factors, infections in infancy, or trauma. See Hearing loss. Cf Postlingual hearing loss.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
In Spain, the prevalence of OTOF mutations was reported as 5% in all cases of non-syndromic autosomal recessive prelingual hearing loss (42).
Prelingual hearing loss is present before speech develops and usually begins before age 3, whereas postlingual hearing loss occurs after the development of normal speech [13].
Resolving the genetic heterogeneity of prelingual hearing loss within one family: Performance comparison and application of two targeted next generation sequencing approaches.
So, speech impairment and reduced speech intelligibility are expected consequences of prelingual hearing loss if early and substantive intervention does not occur (Hudgins & Numbers, 1942; Smith, 1975; Yoshinaga-Itano & Sedey, 1998).
Consequently, they often are poorly articulated or omitted by speakers with severe-to-profound prelingual hearing loss (Geffner, 1980; Tye-Murray & Kirk, 1993).
Improvements in speech perception by children with profound prelingual hearing loss: Effects of device, communication mode, and chronological age.
This includes patients with a prelingual hearing loss, despite recognition that these patients may have very limited linguistic benefit.