prejudice

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prejudice

1. A preconceived judgment or opinion formed without factual knowledge.
2. Irrational hostility, hatred, or suspicion of a particular group, race, or religion.

prejudice

The maintenance of an adverse opinion about a person or class of persons in spite of evidence to the contrary. This is a common characteristic of the human being and is linked with the habit of arguing illogically from the particular to the general and the tendency to irrational chauvinism.
References in periodicals archive ?
Students enrolled in Psychology of Prejudice and Introductory Psychology courses completed measures of racism, sexism, and attitudes toward homosexuals at the beginning and end of the term.
We see only what our prejudices allow us to see, and like only what our prejudices allow us to like.
This Ramadan, Coca-Cola said it hopes to tackle societal prejudice by inspiring the Middle East to remove the labels they put on people.
Although loving-kindness is a powerful practice, it's not clear whether it can soften the prejudices of the most discriminatory.
Hogan and Mallot (2005) used seven questions from the Modem Racism Scale to examine whether a university's general education course on race and gender issues reduced racial prejudices and attitudes.
Such commonplace prejudices form the foundation upon which more extreme acts of prejudice build.
In other words, a social context where certain behaviors and opinions about the outgroup tend to disappear from the public sphere might deactivate the traditional (blatant) prejudices toward different groups (Kawakami & Dovidio, 2001) but might leave the less recognizable (subtle) prejudice relatively unaltered.
The above references are just a few prejudices that all of us harbor.
This research provides the first evidence for a facial metric that not only predicts important and controversial social behaviors, such as reporting prejudices, but can also be used by others to make accurate judgments," said Hehman.
As their interfering mother engineers various courtships, will Elizabeth overcome her prejudices and see past the proud exterior of the enigmatic Mr Darcy?
Interest in the implicit aspects of prejudice thus comes from the prevailing norm in our society that open expression of our prejudices should be avoided.