prejudice


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to prejudice: Without prejudice

prejudice

1. A preconceived judgment or opinion formed without factual knowledge.
2. Irrational hostility, hatred, or suspicion of a particular group, race, or religion.

prejudice

The maintenance of an adverse opinion about a person or class of persons in spite of evidence to the contrary. This is a common characteristic of the human being and is linked with the habit of arguing illogically from the particular to the general and the tendency to irrational chauvinism.
References in classic literature ?
Such is the case now, after so many ancient prejudices have been overthrown; and it was far more so in ante-Revolutionary days, when the aristocracy could venture to be proud, and the low were content to be abased.
The boys addressed responded the invariable "Yes, Mas'r," for ages the watchword of poor Africa; but it's to be owned they did not look particularly cheerful; they had their various little prejudices in favor of wives, mothers, sisters, and children, seen for the last time,--and though "they that wasted them required of them mirth," it was not instantly forthcoming.
Rebecca had had to stand on a chair to reach them; now she could do it by stretching; and this is symbolic of the way in which she unconsciously scaled the walls of Miss Miranda's dogmatism and prejudice.
Linton has a prejudice against me: we quarrelled at one time of our lives, with unchristian ferocity; and, if you mention coming here to him, he'll put a veto on your visits altogether.
No, he daren't," answered Mistress Mary, thinking the thing out quite without prejudice.
Vanstone's side by a hearty interest in his neighbor's three sons -- an interest by which those sons benefited all the more importantly, seeing that one of the prejudices which their father had outlived was a prejudice in favor of his own children.
How can you reconcile it to your conscience, I wonder, to prejudice my own boy against me, or against anybody who is dear to me?
But that he was not to be, without ignorance or prejudice, mistaken for a gentleman, my father most strongly asseverates; because it is a principle of his that no man who was not a true gentleman at heart, ever was, since the world began, a true gentleman in manner.
It was his purpose, at the same time, to have rendered the experiment as complete as possible, by bringing the intended work before the public as the effort of a new candidate for their favour, in order that no degree of prejudice, whether favourable or the reverse, might attach to it, as a new production of the Author of Waverley; but this intention was afterwards departed from, for reasons to be hereafter mentioned.
This seems an unneighborly business, Sir Charles," said Trefusis, quite at his ease; " but as it is a public question, it need not prejudice our private relations.
This I mention as an instance of the great power of habit and prejudice.
Manager, without prejudice to these little observations, Your Most Humble and Obedient Servant, OPERA GHOST.