prehension


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prehension

 [pre-hen´shun]
the act of grasping.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

pre·hen·sion

(prē-hen'shŭn),
The act of grasping, or taking hold of.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

pre·hen·sion

(prē-hen'shŭn)
The act of grasping, or taking hold of.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
As discussed earlier, the most serious problem here is that the intuitions behind prehension and nexus seem to be switched with respect to Sowa's interpretation.
No longer capable of maintaining its object at the remove of representation, seeing grasplit so greedily as to absorb it into the opacity of the perceiving body itself--thus subsuming sight within a broader field of fundamentally tactile prehension.
According to Kant, besides the immediate prehension (fassen) of the magnitude of a basic measure, there are two other activities which the imagination must perform.
Whitehead's actual occasions are the "atoms" of his system, and his concept of prehension is the central idea that expresses the relations among actual occasions.
In the animal world, a variety of organs are adapted for prehension. According to Rabischong, [19] they may be divided into four types: organ that pinch, encircle, push and adhere.
This is achieved through acts of what Whitehead calls prehension, coming from the Latin verb prehensio meaning 'to seize' Eternal objects provide the 'subjective aim' or 'lure' (46) of an actual entity, and reflect the nascent potentiality of nature.
The animal recovered uneventfully without any hindrance to prehension.
The posturing of wrist joints during prehension mainly depends on the forearm posture, the grasping object posture, and the task.
The final position achieved presented a deviation to the right side (Fig 8) but this did not compromise normal prehension and swallowing of food.
Clinicians used both ISNCSCI (International Standards for Neurological Classification of Spinal Cord Injury) and GRASSP (Graded Assessment of Strength Sensibility and Prehension) measures to establish a pre-transplant baseline for each patient and to assess post-transplant progress.