prehensile


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prehensile

 [pre-hen´sil]
adapted for grasping or seizing.

pre·hen·sile

(prē-hen'sil),
Adapted for taking hold of or grasping.
[L. prehendo, pp. -hensus, to lay hold of, seize]

prehensile

/pre·hen·sile/ (-hen´sil) adapted for grasping or seizing.

prehensile

[-hen′sil]
Etymology: L, prehendre, to seize
able to grasp.

pre·hen·sile

(prē-hen'sil)
Adapted for taking hold of or grasping.
[L. prehendo, pp. -hensus, to lay hold of, seize]

prehensile

adapted for holding or grasping, as are the tails of many New World monkeys.

prehensile

adapted to grasp

prehensile

adapted for grasping or seizing.
References in periodicals archive ?
Characterizing human hand prehensile strength by force and moment wrench.
It appears to have secured itself for transport using its prehensile antennae.
Lasch held that the elites--by which he meant not just the super-wealthy but also their managerial coat holders and professional apologists--were undermining the country's promise as a constitutional republic with their prehensile greed, their asocial cultural values, and their absence of civic responsibility.
The Great Ape sat on the bar and operated the taps with his prehensile feet until the barmaid came over.
They present many adaptations to benthic life, such as vertical body posture, a prehensile tail and highly sedentary behavior (Schmid & Senn 2002).
Being told you have a dive reflex may sound as worrying as discovering you have a prehensile tail, but Roxanne, the formerly unsporty ad agency girl who's selected, is chuffed to bits, even if it involves wearing a wetsuit and, alarmingly, coughing up blood.
The genesis of this research came from the efforts of Sperber to "explain why evolution did not make the manifold flaws in reasoning go the way of the prehensile tail and the four-legged stride" (Cohen, 2011, p.
12) One of his arguments concerned the ontological differences between the human hand and the animal paw, his view being that animals do not have hands, they only have prehensile organs.
Play now is more likely to expose our youngsters to the risk of repetitive strain injury, or early onset prehensile thumbs.
They will then hold onto a piece of seaweed with their prehensile (grasping) tail, and remain still to ambush small prey as it swims by.