pregnancy-related death


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pregnancy-related death

The death of a woman occurring within 6 weeks after pregnancy, conception, or termination of pregnancy.
See also: death
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
MMRCs identified an average of three to four contributing factors and two to three prevention strategies per pregnancy-related death. Contributing factors were thematically coded as community factors (e.g., unstable housing and limited access to transportation); health facility factors (e.g., limited experience with obstetric emergencies and lack of appropriate personnel or services); patient factors (e.g., lack of knowledge of warning signs and nonadherence to medical regimens); provider factors (e.g., missed or delayed diagnosis and lack of continuity of care); and system-level factors (e.g., inadequate access to care and poor case coordination) (Table 3).
Causes of Pregnancy-Related Death in the United States Percentage of all pregnancy-related deaths.
[6,7] While research has identified the levels and determinants of adolescent fertility,[8] the issue of adolescent maternal and pregnancy-related deaths has yet to be addressed.
Though pregnancy-related deaths fell dramatically in the 20th century, they have been on the rise since 1987, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
The move comes after the Why Mothers Die report by the Confidential Enquiry into Maternal and Child Health which found 35% of women who had a pregnancy-related death were obese.
Indirect MD is a pregnancy-related death in a patient with pre-existing or newly developed health problem.
ICD-10 also introduces two terms related to maternal death: pregnancy-related death and late maternal death.
The Pakistan Demographic and Health Survey 2006-07 confirmed that rural areas, where most Pakistanis live, have the highest rates of pregnancy-related death. The maternal mortality ratio is 319 per 100,000 live births in rural areas, where 74 percent of deliveries occur at home and only 30 percent are attended by a skilled provider.
In August of 2003, Harper et al., published an article titled "Pregnancy-Related Death and Health Care Services" (3) in Obstetrics & Gynecology, ACOG's journal.
Overall, women aged 35 or older had a risk of pregnancy-related death that was nearly three times as high as that of women aged 25-29 (risk ratio, 2.7); the risk was more than two times as high among women aged 35-39 and five times as high among those aged 40 or older (2.3 and 5.0, respectively).
Ectopic pregnancy now ranks as the leading cause of pregnancy-related death among women in the first trimester.
DeGette called it "one of the most striking aspects" that black women "are nearly four times as likely to experience a pregnancy-related death."

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